Polar Biology

, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 659–661

Recent decrease in chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica) populations at two of Admiralty Bay’s islets on King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

Authors

    • Laboratory of Ornithology and Marine AnimalsUniversidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos
  • Tatiana Coelho Balbão
    • Laboratory of Ornithology and Marine AnimalsUniversidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos
  • Michael John Polito
    • Department of Biology and Marine BiologyUniversity of North Carolina at Wilmington
  • Erli Schneider Costa
    • Ecology Pos-graduate ProgramUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
  • Ana Paula Bertoldi Carneiro
    • Laboratory of Ornithology and Marine AnimalsUniversidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos
Short Note

DOI: 10.1007/s00300-007-0259-1

Cite this article as:
Sander, M., Balbão, T.C., Polito, M.J. et al. Polar Biol (2007) 30: 659. doi:10.1007/s00300-007-0259-1

Abstract

We examined the breeding populations of chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) on Chabrier Rock and Shag Island within Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica from 2002 to 2004. When comparing our results to historic data from 1979, we found an overall decline of 57% in the last 25 years, mirroring the population trend of this species in other regions of the Antarctic Peninsula. Our results are discussed in relation to factors hypothesized to be driving the declines found at other sites, as well as the importance of consistent annual censuses to accurately determine population trends.

Keywords

Chinstrap penguinChinstrap populationsAntarctic birds

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007