Polar Biology

, Volume 25, Issue 7, pp 538–541

New perspectives on the dispersal mechanisms of the Antarctic brooding bivalve Mysella charcoti (Lamy, 1906)

  • Osmar Domaneschi
  • José da Silva
  • Laércio Neto
  • Flávio Passos
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00300-002-0379-6

Cite this article as:
Domaneschi, O., da Silva, J., Neto, L. et al. Polar Biol (2002) 25: 538. doi:10.1007/s00300-002-0379-6

Abstract.

Brooding is a widespread phenomenon among Antarctic bivalves. Although it should represent a handicap to dispersion, many brooding species have achieved a wide distribution in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, suggesting that they have alternative and effective methods of dispersal. Evidence of such an alternative method is presented here for the bivalve Mysella charcoti, unexpectedly found alive and healthy in feces expelled by Nototheniacoriiceps (Nototheniidae: Pisces). The finding indicates that the snug-fitting shell of Mysella functions as a barrier to digestive enzymes. Withstanding passage through the digestive tract of fish allows Mysella to be passively dispersed (within the home range of the fish) and colonize new habitats or re-colonize shallow-water substrates severely impacted by ice scours.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Osmar Domaneschi
    • 1
  • José da Silva
    • 2
  • Laércio Neto
    • 2
  • Flávio Passos
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências da Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 11461, CEP 05422-970, São Paulo (SP), Brazil
  2. 2.Departamento de Histologia e Embriologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 1524, CEP 05508-900, São Paulo (SP), Brazil

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