Rheumatology International

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 1–9

German guidelines for the sequential medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with traditional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

  • Katinka Albrecht
  • Klaus Krüger
  • Jürgen Wollenhaupt
  • Rieke Alten
  • Marina Backhaus
  • Christoph Baerwald
  • Wolfgang Bolten
  • Jürgen Braun
  • Harald Burkhardt
  • Gerd R. Burmester
  • Markus Gaubitz
  • Angela Gause
  • Erika Gromnica-Ihle
  • Herbert Kellner
  • Jens Kuipers
  • Andreas Krause
  • Hans-Martin Lorenz
  • Bernhard Manger
  • Hubert Nüßlein
  • Hans-Georg Pott
  • Andrea Rubbert-Roth
  • Matthias Schneider
  • Christof Specker
  • Hendrik Schulze-Koops
  • Hans-Peter Tony
  • Siegfried Wassenberg
  • Ulf Müller-Ladner
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00296-013-2848-3

Cite this article as:
Albrecht, K., Krüger, K., Wollenhaupt, J. et al. Rheumatol Int (2014) 34: 1. doi:10.1007/s00296-013-2848-3

Abstract

The German Society of Rheumatology approved new German guidelines for the sequential medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) based on the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of RA published in 2010. An update of the EULAR systematic literature research was performed in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Meta-analyses, controlled trials, cohort studies, and registry data addressing traditional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and treatment strategies published between January 2009 and August 2011 were included. Two reviewers independently evaluated and compared the additional data that had been published after the time limit set by the EULAR recommendations. A national guideline working group developed an adapted set of recommendations. The new German guidelines were accepted by vote using an informal Delphi approach. Twelve recommendations and the resulting updated treatment algorithm were developed and approved as a practical orientation for rheumatologists. These recommendations are based on a successive treatment with traditional and biologic disease-modifying drugs depending on the individual progress of the disease and distinct patient characteristics. The German guidelines have been developed on the basis of the internationally well-recognized EULAR recommendations. In addition, more recent evidence from a systematic literature research was considered. They have been developed and approved by a group of national experts aiming at guidance for rheumatologists to reach best medical practice.

Keywords

Rheumatoid arthritisClinical practice guidelineDisease-modifying antirheumatic drugsGlucocorticoidsBiologic agents

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katinka Albrecht
    • 1
  • Klaus Krüger
    • 2
  • Jürgen Wollenhaupt
    • 3
  • Rieke Alten
    • 4
  • Marina Backhaus
    • 5
  • Christoph Baerwald
    • 6
  • Wolfgang Bolten
    • 7
  • Jürgen Braun
    • 8
  • Harald Burkhardt
    • 9
  • Gerd R. Burmester
    • 5
  • Markus Gaubitz
    • 10
  • Angela Gause
    • 11
  • Erika Gromnica-Ihle
    • 12
  • Herbert Kellner
    • 13
  • Jens Kuipers
    • 14
  • Andreas Krause
    • 15
  • Hans-Martin Lorenz
    • 16
  • Bernhard Manger
    • 17
  • Hubert Nüßlein
    • 18
  • Hans-Georg Pott
    • 19
  • Andrea Rubbert-Roth
    • 20
  • Matthias Schneider
    • 21
  • Christof Specker
    • 22
  • Hendrik Schulze-Koops
    • 23
  • Hans-Peter Tony
    • 24
  • Siegfried Wassenberg
    • 25
  • Ulf Müller-Ladner
    • 26
  1. 1.German Society of RheumatologyBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Centre of RheumatologyMunichGermany
  3. 3.Rheumatologikum, Schoen HospitalHamburgGermany
  4. 4.Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, Schlosspark-ClinicUniversity Medicine BerlinBerlinGermany
  5. 5.Department of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyCharité University Medicine Berlin, Free University and Humboldt UniversityBerlinGermany
  6. 6.Department of Rheumatology and GerontologyUniversity of LeipzigLeipzigGermany
  7. 7.Department of Internal Medicine and RheumatologyKlaus Miehlke HospitalWiesbadenGermany
  8. 8.Centre of Rheumatology RuhrSt. Josef HospitalHerneGermany
  9. 9.Department of RheumatologyJohann Wolfgang Goethe UniversityFrankfurt MainGermany
  10. 10.Interdisciplinary Diagnostic and TherapyWWUMünsterGermany
  11. 11.Centre of Rheumatology and AutoimmunologyHamburgGermany
  12. 12.German League Against RheumatismBonnGermany
  13. 13.Practice for Rheumatology and Gastroenterology and Head of the Department of Rheumatology Hospital NeuwittelsbachMunichGermany
  14. 14.Department of Internal RheumatologyRed Cross HospitalBremenGermany
  15. 15.Department of RheumatologyImmanuel Hospital, Berlin-BuchBerlinGermany
  16. 16.Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine VUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  17. 17.Department of RheumatologyUniversity of ErlangenErlangenGermany
  18. 18.Practice of Internal RheumatologyNurembergGermany
  19. 19.Practice of Rheumatology, Physical Therapy and Clinical ImmunologyHannoverGermany
  20. 20.Department of Immunology and RheumatologyUniversity of CologneCologneGermany
  21. 21.Department of RheumatologyHeinrich-Heine-UniversityDüsseldorfGermany
  22. 22.Department of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyKliniken Essen SüdEssenGermany
  23. 23.Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Med. Klinik und Poliklinik IVLMU MünchenMunichGermany
  24. 24.Department of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of WurzburgWürzburgGermany
  25. 25.Evangelisches Fachkrankenhaus Ratingen, RheumatologieRatingenGermany
  26. 26.Department of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyJustus-Liebig University, Giessen, Kerckhoff KlinikBad NauheimGermany