Rheumatology International

, Volume 32, Issue 11, pp 3691–3694

Low level of seroconversion after a novel influenza A/H1N1/2009 vaccination in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the 2009 season

Authors

    • Division of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyJichi Medical University
    • Department of MedicineJapanese Red Cross Society Koga Hospital
    • Department of MedicineShimotsuga General Hospital
  • Sumiko Homma
    • Department of MedicineJapanese Red Cross Society Koga Hospital
  • Sachiko Onishi
    • Division of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyJichi Medical University
    • Department of MedicineUtsunomiya Social Insurance Hospital
  • Yasuyuki Kamata
    • Division of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyJichi Medical University
  • Katsuya Nagatani
    • Division of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyJichi Medical University
    • Department of MedicineKawakami Hospital
  • Zentaro Yamagata
    • Department of Health SciencesUniversity of Yamanashi
  • Seiji Minota
    • Division of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyJichi Medical University
    • Department of MedicineKawakami Hospital
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00296-011-2118-1

Cite this article as:
Iwamoto, M., Homma, S., Onishi, S. et al. Rheumatol Int (2012) 32: 3691. doi:10.1007/s00296-011-2118-1

Abstract

We examined change in the antibody titre against pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 before and after vaccination in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This observational study was conducted with the participation of five hospitals in Japan. A total of 89 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were included in this study. The seroprotection and seroresponse rates to vaccination with the pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 vaccine were analysed. The seroprotection rates prior to the vaccination were 5.6% in the Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The seroprotection rates after subcutaneous vaccination were 55.1%. The seroresponse rate after subcutaneous vaccination was 50.6% in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Both the seroprotection and seroresponse rates obtained after the vaccination with the pandemic influenza A/H1N1/2009 vaccine were low in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We should realise that a vaccination against this newly emerged influenza virus may protect only half of the Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a real world.

Keywords

Influenza A/H1N1/2009VaccinationRheumatoid arthritis

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011