Seminars in Immunopathology

, Volume 34, Issue 6, pp 847–861

Immunopathogenesis of lymphatic filarial disease

Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00281-012-0346-4

Cite this article as:
Babu, S. & Nutman, T.B. Semin Immunopathol (2012) 34: 847. doi:10.1007/s00281-012-0346-4

Abstract

Although two thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ∼40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce changes that result in dilatation of lymphatics and thickening of the lymphatic vessel walls. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results from the summation of the effect of tissue alterations induced by both living and nonliving adult parasites, the host inflammatory response to the parasites and their secreted antigens, the host inflammatory response to the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and those seen as a consequence of secondary bacterial or fungal infections. Inflammatory damage induced by filarial parasites appears to be multifactorial, with endogenous parasite products, Wolbachia, and host immunity all playing important roles. This review will initially examine the prototypical immune responses engendered by the parasite and delineate the regulatory mechanisms elicited to prevent immune-mediated pathology. This will be followed by a discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, with the central theme being that pathogenesis is a two-step process—the first initiated by the parasite and host innate immune system and the second propagated mainly by the host's adaptive immune system and by other factors (including secondary infections).

Keywords

Filariasis Pathology Lymphedema Hydrocele Cytokines Immunity 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NIAID/TRC (now NIRT) ICERChennaiIndia
  2. 2.Helminth Immunology Section, Laboratory of Parasitic DiseasesNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.National Institute for Research in TuberculosisChennaiIndia

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