Springer Seminars in Immunopathology

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 233–247

Animal models of intestinal inflammation: ineffective communication between coalition members

  • Robin G. Lorenz
  • Vance J. McCracken
  • Charles O. Elson
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00281-005-0208-4

Cite this article as:
Lorenz, R.G., McCracken, V.J. & Elson, C.O. Springer Semin Immun (2005) 27: 233. doi:10.1007/s00281-005-0208-4

Abstract

The microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal immune cells in the intestine comprise an important gastrointestinal coalition. The intestinal microbiota can exert both beneficial as well as deleterious effects on their animal hosts. They interact with the innate defenses provided by epithelial cells through microbial recognition receptors. This communication, under normal conditions, results in a state of controlled inflammation. This article will focus on several animal models of intestinal inflammation, in which spontaneous or induced mutations or other genetic manipulations result in severe alterations in one of the members of the gastrointestinal coalition. These animal models of colitis have shown that alterations in communication between members of this coalition ultimately lead to gastrointestinal disease.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin G. Lorenz
    • 1
  • Vance J. McCracken
    • 1
  • Charles O. Elson
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyThe University of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineThe University of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.Division of Gastroenterology and HepatologyThe University of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA