Annals of Hematology

, Volume 78, Issue 8, pp 358–363

Serum transferrin receptors in detection of iron deficiency in pregnancy

  • U. Rusia
  • C. Flowers
  • N. Madan
  • N. Agarwal
  • S. K. Sood
  • M. Sikka
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

DOI: 10.1007/s002770050529

Cite this article as:
Rusia, U., Flowers, C., Madan, N. et al. Ann Hematol (1999) 78: 358. doi:10.1007/s002770050529

Abstract

 A prospective hospital-based study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of serum transferrin receptors in the detection of iron deficiency in pregnant women. The iron status of 100 pregnant women with single uncomplicated term pregnancies in the first stage of labor was established using standard laboratory measures. These included complete hemogram, red cell indices, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In addition, serum transferrin receptor (STFR) was estimated. The results of 81 women with complete laboratory profiles were analyzed. Thirty-five (43.2%) women were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dl). Hemoglobin (Hb) showed a significant correlation with MCH, MCHC, serum iron, and percent transferrin saturation, suggesting that the anemia was likely to be due to iron deficiency. The mean STFR level was 18.05±9.9 mg/l in the anemic women and was significantly raised (p<0.001) compared with that of the nonanemic women. STFR correlated significantly with Hb (p<0.001), MCH (p<0.05), MCHC (p<0.01), serum iron (p<0.01), and percent transferrin saturation (p<0.01) and also showed a highly significant correlation with the degree of anemia. Serum ferritin in these women did not correlate with Hb, and only 54.4% of the women had levels <12 ng/ml, which does not reflect the true prevalence of iron deficiency. Serum transferrin receptor estimation is thus a useful measure for detecting iron deficiency in pregnancy.

Key words Iron deficiency Transferrin receptors Anemia in pregnancy 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Rusia
    • 1
  • C. Flowers
    • 2
  • N. Madan
    • 1
  • N. Agarwal
    • 3
  • S. K. Sood
    • 1
  • M. Sikka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, University College of Medical Sciences and G.T.B. Hospital, Shahdara, Delhi-110095, India e-mail: dbmi@ucms.ernet.in, Fax: 011-2290495IN
  2. 2.School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, Kansas 66160–7233, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University College of Medical Sciences and G.T.B. Hospital, Shahdara, Delhi-110095 IndiaIN

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