Annals of Hematology

, Volume 86, Issue 1, pp 1–8

Human mesenchymal stem cells favour healing of the cutaneous radiation syndrome in a xenogenic transplant model

  • Sabine François
  • Moubarak Mouiseddine
  • Noëlle Mathieu
  • Alexandra Semont
  • Pascale Monti
  • Nicolas Dudoignon
  • Amandine Saché
  • Asma Boutarfa
  • Dominique Thierry
  • Patrick Gourmelon
  • Alain Chapel
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00277-006-0166-5

Cite this article as:
François, S., Mouiseddine, M., Mathieu, N. et al. Ann Hematol (2007) 86: 1. doi:10.1007/s00277-006-0166-5

Abstract

It has been suggested that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) could be used to repair numerous injured tissues. We have studied the potential use of hMSC to limit radiation-induced skin lesions. Immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice were locally irradiated to the leg (30 Gy, dose rate 2.7 Gy/min) using a 60Co source to induce a severe skin lesion. Cultured bone marrow hMSC were delivered intravenously to the mice. The irradiated skin samples were studied for the presence of the human cells, the severity of the lesions and the healing process. Macroscopic analysis and histology results showed that the lesions were evolving to a less severe degree of radiation dermatitis after hMSC transplant when compared to irradiated non-transplanted controls. Clinical scores for the studied skin parameters of treated mice were significantly improved. A faster healing was observed when compared to untreated mouse. Immunohistology and polymerase chain reaction analysis provided evidence that the human cells were found in the irradiated area. These results suggest a possible use of hMSC for the treatment of the early phase of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. A successful transplant of stem cells and subsequent reduction in radiation-induced complication may open the road to completely new strategies in cutaneous radiation syndrome therapy.

Keywrods

Human mesenchymal stem cellsRadiation-induced skin lesionsCutaneous radiation syndromeXenogenic transplant model

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabine François
    • 1
  • Moubarak Mouiseddine
    • 1
  • Noëlle Mathieu
    • 1
  • Alexandra Semont
    • 1
  • Pascale Monti
    • 1
  • Nicolas Dudoignon
    • 2
  • Amandine Saché
    • 1
  • Asma Boutarfa
    • 1
  • Dominique Thierry
    • 1
  • Patrick Gourmelon
    • 3
  • Alain Chapel
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cell Therapy and Radioprotection of the Accident, Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological Protection and Human Health DivisionInstitut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire DRPH/SRBE/LTCRAFontenay aux Roses CEDEXFrance
  2. 2.Laboratory of Radiopathology Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological Protection and Human Health DivisionInstitut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire DRPH/SRBE/LTCRAFontenay aux Roses CEDEXFrance
  3. 3.Radiological Protection and Human Health DivisionInstitut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN/DRPH)Fontenay aux Roses CEDEXFrance