CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 449–454

Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

  • Clare L. Bent
  • Nikolas Fotiadis
  • Ian Renfrew
  • Michael Walsh
  • Karim Brohi
  • Constantinos Kyriakides
  • Matthew Matson
Clinical Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s00270-009-9537-3

Cite this article as:
Bent, C.L., Fotiadis, N., Renfrew, I. et al. Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol (2009) 32: 449. doi:10.1007/s00270-009-9537-3

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 ± 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A ‘preclose’ closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 ± 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

Keywords

Endovascular abdominal aortic repairStent-graftPercutaneous

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clare L. Bent
    • 1
  • Nikolas Fotiadis
    • 1
  • Ian Renfrew
    • 1
  • Michael Walsh
    • 2
  • Karim Brohi
    • 2
  • Constantinos Kyriakides
    • 3
  • Matthew Matson
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Diagnostic ImagingBarts and The London NHS TrustLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Vascular Surgery and Trauma SurgeryBarts and The London NHS TrustLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Vascular Surgery and Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and DentistryBarts and The London NHS TrustLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of Interventional RadiologyRoyal London HospitalLondonUK