Physics and Chemistry of Minerals

, Volume 26, Issue 6, pp 432–436

A Raman spectroscopic study of shock-wave densification of anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) glass

Authors

  • B. Reynard
    • Géosciences Rennes CNRS UPR 4661, Université de Rennes1, F. 35042 Rennes Cedex, France E-mail: breynard@ens-lyon.fr
  • M. Okuno
    • Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, 920-1192, Japan
  • Y. Shimada
    • Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, 920-1192, Japan
  • Y. Syono
    • Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980, Japan
  • C. Willaime
    • Géosciences Rennes CNRS UPR 4661, Université de Rennes1, F. 35042 Rennes Cedex, France E-mail: breynard@ens-lyon.fr
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002690050205

Cite this article as:
Reynard, B., Okuno, M., Shimada, Y. et al. Phys Chem Min (1999) 26: 432. doi:10.1007/s002690050205

Abstract

Structural modifications induced by shock-wave compression up to 40 GPa in anorthite glass are investigated by Raman spectroscopy. In the first investigation, densification increases with increasing shock pressure. A maximum densification of 2.2% is obtained for a shock pressure of 24 GPa. This densification is attributed to a decrease of the average ring size, favoring three-membered rings. The densification is much lower than in silica glass subject to shock at similar pressures (11%), because the T-O-T bond angle decrease is impeded in anorthite glass. For higher shock pressures, the decrease of the recovered densification is attributed to partial annealing of the samples due to high after-shock residual temperatures. The study of the annealing process of the most densified glass by in-situ high temperature Raman spectroscopy confirms that relaxation of the three-membered rings occurs above about 900 K.

Keywords anorthite glassshock compressiondensified glassRaman spectroscopy

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999