Physics and Chemistry of Minerals

, Volume 31, Issue 8, pp 532–542

Structural evolutions of an obsidian and its fused glass by shock-wave compression

Authors

    • Department of Earth Science, Faculty of ScienceKanazawa University
  • M. Okuno
    • Department of Earth Science, Faculty of ScienceKanazawa University
  • Y. Syono
    • Institute for Materials ResearchTohoku University
  • M. Kikuchi
    • Institute for Materials ResearchTohoku University
  • K. Fukuoka
    • Institute for Materials ResearchTohoku University
  • M. Koyano
    • School of Materials ScienceJapan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • S. Katayama
    • School of Materials ScienceJapan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00269-004-0408-9

Cite this article as:
Shimoda, K., Okuno, M., Syono, Y. et al. Phys Chem Minerals (2004) 31: 532. doi:10.1007/s00269-004-0408-9

Abstract

Shock-recovery experiments for obsidian and its fused glass have been carried out with pressure up to 35 GPa. Structural evolution accompanying the shock compression was investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The densities of obsidian and its fused glass increased with applied shock pressure up to ∼25 GPa. Densification reached a maximum of 4.7 and 3.6% for obsidian and its fused glass, respectively. The densification mechanism is attributed to reduction of the T–O–T angle, and changes in ring statistics in the structure. Density reduction observed at greater than 25 GPa of applied shock pressure is due to partial annealing of the high-density glass structures brought by high post-shock residual temperature. The density of fused glass is almost equal to its original value at 35 GPa while the shocked obsidian has a slightly lower value than its original value. Amorphization of crystallites present in the obsidian due to shock compression is probably the cause of the density decrease. The structural evolution observed in shock-compressed obsidian and its fused glass can be explained by densification resulting from average T–O–T angle reduction and increase of small rings, and subsequent structural relaxation by high post-shock temperature at applied shock compression above ∼25 GPa.

Keywords

ObsidianShock compressionDensified glassCrystallite

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004