World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 359–363

Strictureplasty for Crohn’s Disease: Techniques and Long-term Results

Authors

  • Roger D. Hurst
    • Department of Surgery, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
  • Fabrizio Michelassi
    • Department of Surgery, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

DOI: 10.1007/s002689900397

Cite this article as:
Hurst, R. & Michelassi, F. World J. Surg. (1998) 22: 359. doi:10.1007/s002689900397

Abstract. Strictureplasty for treatment of symptomatic intestinal strictures secondary to Crohn’s disease is being performed with increasing frequency. To determine the overall clinical results after strictureplasty for Crohn’s disease, all patients undergoing this procedure were prospectively studied. Between 6/1/89 and 2/1/97, 57 Crohn’s disease patients underwent 60 operations utilizing strictureplasties. A total of 109 strictureplasties were performed (90 Heineke-Mikulicz, 6 Finney, and 13 side-to-side isoperistaltic). The 30-day perioperative morbidity was 12%, with complications being less common for patients undergoing elective versus unscheduled operations (

p < 0.002). Recurrence of Crohn’s disease requiring operation was seen in seven patients after a mean follow-up of 38 months. The estimated cumulative recurrence rate after 2 years was 15 ± 6% (± standard error) and 22 ± 10% at 5 years. A recurrence developed at the site of the previous strictureplasty in only five cases. Strictureplasty is a safe, effective means of providing long-term surgical palliation to selected patients with Crohn’s disease. Perioperative complication rates are comparable to those seen with standard surgical treatment, and recurrences are not excessive.

Copyright information

© 1997 by the Société Internationale de Chir ugie