World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 2–5

Use of Pentastarch Solution in the Treatment of Patients with Hemorrhagic Hypovolemia: Randomized Phase II Study in the Emergency Room

Authors

  • Riad N. Younes
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hospital AC Camargo, R. Prof Antonio Prudente 211, São Paulo SP 01509-010, Brazil
  • Ko C. Yin
    • Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Laboratório de Fisiopatologia Cirúrgica (LIM-62), Divisão de Experimentação Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Claudio J. Amino
    • Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Laboratório de Fisiopatologia Cirúrgica (LIM-62), Divisão de Experimentação Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Mario Itinoshe
    • Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Laboratório de Fisiopatologia Cirúrgica (LIM-62), Divisão de Experimentação Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Mauricio Rocha e Silva
    • Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Laboratório de Fisiopatologia Cirúrgica (LIM-62), Divisão de Experimentação Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Dario Birolini
    • Department of Surgery, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Laboratório de Fisiopatologia Cirúrgica (LIM-62), Divisão de Experimentação Instituto do Coração, São Paulo, Brazil

DOI: 10.1007/s002689900340

Cite this article as:
Younes, R., Yin, K., Amino, C. et al. World J. Surg. (1998) 22: 2. doi:10.1007/s002689900340

Abstract. This study evaluates the hemodynamic effects of the administration of 10% pentastarch solution (PS) during the initial treatment of hypovolemia in trauma patients. This prospective randomized phase II study included trauma patients admitted to the emergency room with hemorrhagic hypovolemia: systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mmHg. Upon admission, the patients were randomized to receive 10% PS (

n= 12) or isotonic 0.9% NaCl solution (IS) (n= 11), infused intravenously in 250-ml boluses, repeated until SBP > 100 mmHg. Blood pressure, infused volumes necessary to maintain SBP, and overall survival rates were determined and compared between groups. SBP increased significantly following either IS (from 64.4 ± 9.2 mmHg to 111.1 ± 6.3 mmHg), or PS (from 63.7 ± 10.6 mmHg to 108.1 ± 9.8 mmHg) when compared to admission values (p < 0.05). Endovenous volumes infused were greater (p= 0.001) in IS patients (1420 ± 298 ml) than in PS patients (356 ± 64 ml). No blood was transfused into PS patients, compared to 370 ± 140 ml of red blood cells transfused into IS patients (p= 0.015). Mortality rates were similar in the two groups (p= 0.725). We concluded that PS is a safe, efficient method for inducing hemodynamic recovery of hypovolemic trauma patients, with a clear reduction in the intravenous volumes required for acute resuscitation.

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© 1998 by the Société Internationale de Chir ugie