, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 341-348

Effects of a New Centrifugation Method on Adipose Cell Viability for Autologous Fat Grafting

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Abstract

The use of adipose tissue transfer in plastic and reconstructive surgery is not new and has been studied extensively. Due to different results with regard to adipose cell damage and the level of survival of the transferred tissue in clinical practice, the authors aimed to investigate the effects of centrifugation on fat aspirates to optimize the centrifugal force for fat transplantation and to obtain an increased number of intact adipose progenitor cells. The following different centrifugation forces were evaluated in vitro in terms of fat decantation: 3,000 rpm (1,500×g), 1,300 rpm (250×g), and 500 rpm (50×g). Moreover, the density level, morphology of fat cells, cell viability, and progenitor cell number also were evaluated. Centrifugation leads to a good fat tissue density, with a significant number of progenitor cells, and efficiently removes the liquid portion. High centrifugal forces (at 3,000 rpm) caused significant damage to fat cells with low cell viability, whereas very low centrifugal forces (at 500 rpm) showed little effect on adipose tissue density, resembling fat decantation. Fat aspirates, withdrawn from 30 healthy donors in vivo, were centrifuged at different rotations per minute (rpm), as follows. For the 10 patients in group A, Coleman’s technique was used with a centrifugation of the aspirated fat at 3,000 rpm (1,500×g) for 3 min. For the 10 patients in group B, the authors’ technique was used, with centrifugation of the aspirated fat at 1,300 rpm (250×g) for 5 min. For the 10 patients in group C, simple decantation of fat was used. In conclusion, a centrifugal force of 1,300 rpm resulted in better density of adipose tissue, with good cell viability and increased ability to preserve a significant number of progenitor cells.