Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 50, Issue 6, pp 483–492

Mitochondrial DNA variation in Eritrean hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas hamadryas): life history influences population genetic structure

  • Andreas Hapke
  • Dietmar Zinner
  • Hans Zischler
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s002650100393

Cite this article as:
Hapke, A., Zinner, D. & Zischler, H. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2001) 50: 483. doi:10.1007/s002650100393

Abstract.

The hamadryas baboon, Papio hamadryas hamadryas, represents a rare exception from the pattern of female philopatry and male-biased dispersal predominant in mammals including primates. To elucidate the possible consequences of the dispersal pattern on the population genetic structure of hamadryas baboons, we sequenced the maternally transmitted mitochondrial hypervariable region I of 74 individuals from ten sampling locations in different ecogeographic zones of Eritrea. To this end, individual fecal samples were collected at sleeping cliffs. Upon comparing the individual sequences by means of phylogenetic tree reconstructions and AMOVA, we could not detect a population genetic structure corresponding to a geographic pattern. Tree reconstructions revealed the existence of two profoundly different lineages both present at most of the sampling locations. These findings and Mantel correlations of genetic distances and the frequency of shared haplotypes to geographic distances point to the presence of female dispersal. Female-mediated gene flow is detectable over geographic distances exceeding those between neighboring subpopulations. Our study therefore corroborates local behavioral observations on a broad geographic scale. After inclusion of geographically closely situated olive baboons, P. h. anubis, in the analyses, all anubis sequences fell within one hamadryas clade. Possible scenarios leading to this situation including long-term hybridization processes are discussed.

Papio hamadryas Population structure Sex-biased dispersal Mitochondrial DNA AMOVA 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Hapke
    • 1
  • Dietmar Zinner
    • 2
  • Hans Zischler
    • 1
  1. 1.Primate Genetics Group, German Primate Center, Kellnerweg 4, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
  2. 2.Department of Ecology and Ethology, German Primate Center, Kellnerweg 4, 37077 Göttingen, Germany

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