Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 149–155

Does it matter that male beaugregory damselfish have a mate preference?

Authors

  • M. Itzkowitz
    • Department of Biological Sciences, Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA
  • M. J. Draud
    • Department of Biological Sciences, Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA
  • J. L. Barnes
    • Department of Biological Sciences, Williams Hall, 31 Williams Drive, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA
  • M. Haley
    • Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, P.O. Box 35, Discovery Bay, Jamaica Tel.: 610-758-3694; Fax: 610-758-4004; e-mail: MI00@Lehigh.edu
ORIGINAL ARTICLES

DOI: 10.1007/s002650050425

Cite this article as:
Itzkowitz, M., Draud, M., Barnes, J. et al. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (1998) 42: 149. doi:10.1007/s002650050425

Abstract

Male beaugregory damselfish (Stegastes leucostictus) spent more time courting larger females in both two-choice and single presentations. Female size was significantly correlated with gonad weight. We also verified that female fecundity was extremely variable within a natural population. We found that male reproductive success was highly correlated with both clutch size and clutch number. However, clutch size was not significantly correlated with clutch number, indicating that males that received larger clutches did not receive more egg clutches. Furthermore, there was no difference between the number of offspring produced by males that mated with the largest females and by males that mated with the most females. Thus, although males preferred larger females, males produced similar numbers of offspring by mating with large females or mating with many females.

Key words StegastesleucostictusMate choiceCoral reefCaribbean

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998