Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 68, Issue 11, pp 1777–1784

Pathogen-associated self-medication behavior in the honeybee Apis mellifera

  • Bogdan I. Gherman
  • Andreas Denner
  • Otilia Bobiş
  • Daniel S. Dezmirean
  • Liviu A. Mărghitaş
  • Helge Schlüns
  • Robin F. A. Moritz
  • Silvio Erler
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-014-1786-8

Cite this article as:
Gherman, B.I., Denner, A., Bobiş, O. et al. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2014) 68: 1777. doi:10.1007/s00265-014-1786-8

Abstract

Honeybees, Apis mellifera, have several prophylactic disease defense strategies, including the foraging of antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral compounds of plant products. Hence, honey and pollen contain many compounds that prevent fungal and bacterial growth and inhibit viral replication. Since these compounds are also fed to the larvae by nurse bees, they play a central role for colony health inside the hive. Here, we show that honeybee nurse bees, infected with the microsporidian gut parasite Nosema ceranae, show different preferences for various types of honeys in a simultaneous choice test. Infected workers preferred honeys with a higher antibiotic activity that reduced the microsporidian infection after the consumption of the honey. Since nurse bees feed not only the larvae but also other colony members, this behavior might be a highly adaptive form of therapeutic medication at both the individual and the colony level.

Keywords

HoneybeeHoneyAntimicrobial activityTherapeutic self-medicationNosema ceranaeSocial immunity

Supplementary material

265_2014_1786_MOESM1_ESM.doc (50 kb)
ESM 1(DOC 50.5 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bogdan I. Gherman
    • 1
  • Andreas Denner
    • 1
  • Otilia Bobiş
    • 1
  • Daniel S. Dezmirean
    • 1
  • Liviu A. Mărghitaş
    • 1
  • Helge Schlüns
    • 1
    • 4
  • Robin F. A. Moritz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Silvio Erler
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Apiculture and SericultureUniversity of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary MedicineCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Institut für Biologie, Molekulare ÖkologieMartin-Luther-Universität Halle-WittenbergHalle (Saale)Germany
  3. 3.Department of Zoology and EntomologyUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  4. 4.Behavioural BiologyUniversity of OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany