Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

, Volume 66, Issue 6, pp 975–984

Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches

  • Elisabeth Bolund
  • Holger Schielzeth
  • Wolfgang Forstmeier
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-012-1346-z

Cite this article as:
Bolund, E., Schielzeth, H. & Forstmeier, W. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (2012) 66: 975. doi:10.1007/s00265-012-1346-z

Abstract

Song is used as a signal in sexual selection in a wide range of taxa. In birds, males of many species continue to sing after pair formation. It has been suggested that a high song output after pair formation might serve to attract extra-pair females and to minimise their own partner’s interest in extra-pair copulations. A non-exclusive alternative function that has received only scant attention is that the amount of song might stimulate the own female’s investment into eggs in a quantitative way. We address these hypotheses in a captive population of zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, by relating male undirected song output (i.e. non-courtship song) to male egg siring success and female reproductive investment in two different set-ups. When allowed to breed in aviaries, males with the highest song output were no more attractive than others to females in an analysis of 4,294 extra-pair courtships involving 164 different males, and they also did not sire more offspring (both trends were against the expectation). When breeding in cages with two different partners subsequently, females produced larger eggs with more orange yolks when paired to a male with a high song output. These findings suggest that singing activity in paired zebra finch males might primarily function to stimulate the partner and not to attract extra-pair females.

Keywords

Energetic costsHonest signallingQuality indicatorReproductive stimulationSong outputTaeniopygia guttata

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth Bolund
    • 1
    • 2
  • Holger Schielzeth
    • 1
    • 3
  • Wolfgang Forstmeier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary GeneticsMax Planck Institute for OrnithologySeewiesenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Animal and Plant SciencesUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  3. 3.Department of Evolutionary BiologyBielefeld UniversityBielefeldGermany