Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy

, Volume 45, Issue 5, pp 234–240

Multidimensional flow-cytometric analysis of dendritic cells in peripheral blood of normal donors and cancer patients

  • C. A. Savary
  • Monica L. Grazziutti
  • Bohuslav Melichar
  • Donna Przepiorka
  • Ralph S. Freedman
  • Richard E. Cowart
  • D. M. Cohen
  • E. J. Anaissie
  • Darren G. Woodside
  • Bradley W. McIntyre
  • Duane L. Pierson
  • Neal R. Pellis
  • John H. Rex
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

DOI: 10.1007/s002620050438

Cite this article as:
Savary, C., Grazziutti, M., Melichar, B. et al. Cancer Immunol Immunother (1997) 45: 234. doi:10.1007/s002620050438

Abstract

 We studied the potential of multidimensional flow cytometry to evaluate the frequency and maturation/activation status of dendritic cells in minimally manipulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations (i.e., only separated on Ficoll-Hypaque) of normal donors and cancer patients. A rare subset of HLA-DR+ leukocytes (less than 1% mononuclear cells) was detected in blood of normal donors that displayed all the features of dendritic cells: these cells had high forward-light-scatter characteristics and coexpressed CD4, CD86 and CD54 surface antigens, but lacked the lineage-associated surface markers of T cells, B cells, monocytes, granulocytes or NK i.e. they were CD3, CD19, CD20, CD14, CD11b, CD16, CD56). These physical and phenotypic properties were virtually identical to those of immunomagnetically sorted leukocytes characterized as dendritic-cells on the basis of morphology, phenotype and high stimulatory activity in allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte cultures. Using this flow-cytometric approach we observed that the frequency of dendritic cell-like cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cell specimens of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy alone or those recovering from stem cell transplantation was significantly lower than that of normal individuals (mean ± SE: 0.36 ± 0.05%, 0.14 ± 0.06%, and 0.75 ± 0.04% respectively). Multidimensional flow-cytometric analysis of dendritic cells might represent an important new tool for assessing immunocompetence, and for monitoring the effects of therapeutic regimens on the immune system.

Key words Dendritic cells Flow cytometry Stem cell transplantation Breast cancer 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. Savary
    • 1
  • Monica L. Grazziutti
    • 2
  • Bohuslav Melichar
    • 4
  • Donna Przepiorka
    • 5
  • Ralph S. Freedman
    • 4
  • Richard E. Cowart
    • 3
  • D. M. Cohen
    • 2
  • E. J. Anaissie
    • 3
  • Darren G. Woodside
    • 6
  • Bradley W. McIntyre
    • 6
  • Duane L. Pierson
    • 7
  • Neal R. Pellis
    • 7
  • John H. Rex
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd.- Box 018, Houston, TX 77030, USA Tel.: +1 (713) 792 3134; Fax: +1 (713) 794 4830US
  2. 2.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Center for the Study of Emerging and Reemerging Pathogens, The University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Medical Specialties, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAUS
  4. 4.Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAUS
  5. 5.Department of Hematology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAUS
  6. 6.Department of Immunology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USAUS
  7. 7.National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058-3696, USAUS

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