Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy

, Volume 62, Issue 4, pp 665–675

Enhancement of the anti-melanoma response of Hu14.18K322A by αCD40 + CpG

Authors

    • Department of Human OncologyUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Mitchell Luangrath
    • Department of Human OncologyUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Megan M. Elsenheimer
    • Department of Human OncologyUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Stephen D. Gillies
    • Provenance Biopharmaceuticals Corp.
  • Fariba Navid
    • Department of OncologySt. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • Alexander L. Rakhmilevich
    • Department of Human OncologyUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Paul Carbone Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Paul M. Sondel
    • Department of Human OncologyUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Paul Carbone Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Department of PediatricsUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
Original article

DOI: 10.1007/s00262-012-1372-8

Cite this article as:
Alderson, K.L., Luangrath, M., Elsenheimer, M.M. et al. Cancer Immunol Immunother (2013) 62: 665. doi:10.1007/s00262-012-1372-8

Abstract

Targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAb) can be used therapeutically for tumors with identifiable antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2, expressed on neuroblastoma and melanoma tumors. Anti-GD2 mAbs (αGD2) can provide clinical benefit in patients with neuroblastoma. An important mechanism of mAb therapy is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Combinatorial therapeutic strategies can dramatically increase the anti-tumor response elicited by mAbs. We combined a novel αGD2 mAb, hu14.18K322A, with an immunostimulatory regimen of agonist CD40 mAb and class B CpG-ODN 1826 (CpG). Combination immunotherapy was more effective than the single therapeutic components in a syngeneic model of GD2-expressing B16 melanoma with minimal tumor burden. NK cell depletion in B6 mice showed that NK cells were required for the anti-tumor effect; however, anti-tumor responses were also observed in tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice. Thus, NK cell cytotoxicity did not appear to be essential. Peritoneal macrophages from anti-CD40 + CpG-treated mice inhibited tumor cells in vitro in an hu14.18K322A antibody-dependent manner. These data highlight the importance of myeloid cells as potential effectors in immunotherapy regimens utilizing tumor-specific mAb and suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the therapeutic potential of activated myeloid cells and their interaction with NK cells.

Keywords

GD2MelanomaAntibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)CD40MacrophageNK cell

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012