European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

, Volume 40, Issue 9, pp 1384–1393

Phase I pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study with escalating doses of 223Ra-dichloride in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

  • Jorge A. Carrasquillo
  • Joseph A. O’Donoghue
  • Neeta Pandit-Taskar
  • John L. Humm
  • Dana E. Rathkopf
  • Susan F. Slovin
  • Matthew J. Williamson
  • Kristine Lacuna
  • Anne-Kirsti Aksnes
  • Steven M. Larson
  • Howard I. Scher
  • Michael J. Morris
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00259-013-2427-6

Cite this article as:
Carrasquillo, J.A., O’Donoghue, J.A., Pandit-Taskar, N. et al. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging (2013) 40: 1384. doi:10.1007/s00259-013-2427-6

Abstract

Purpose

223Ra-Dichloride (223Ra) is a novel bone-seeking alpha-emitter that prolongs survival in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We conducted a study to better profile the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution of this agent.

Methods

Ten patients received either 50, 100, or 200 kBq of 223Ra per kilogram of body weight. Subsequently, six of these ten patients received a second dose of 50 kBq/kg. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution were assessed by serial blood sampling, planar imaging, and whole-body counting. Pharmacodynamic assessment was based on measurements of prostate-specific antigen, bone alkaline phosphatase, and serum N-telopeptide. Safety was also assessed.

Results

Pharmacokinetic studies showed rapid clearance of 223Ra from the vasculature, with a median of 14 % (range 9–34 %), 2 % (range 1.6–3.9 %), and 0.5 % (range 0.4–1.0 %) remaining in plasma at the end of infusion, after 4 h, and after 24 h, respectively. Biodistribution studies showed early passage into the small bowel and subsequent fecal excretion with a median of 52 % of administered 223Ra in the bowel at 24 h. Urinary excretion was relatively minor (median of 4 % of administered 223Ra). Bone retention was prolonged. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Pharmacodynamic effects were observed (alkaline phosphatase and serum N-telopeptides) in a significant fraction of patients.

Conclusion

223Ra cleared rapidly from plasma and rapidly transited into small bowel, with fecal excretion the major route of elimination. Administered activities up to 200 kBq/kg were associated with few side effects and appeared to induce a decline in serum indicators of bone turnover.

Keywords

Bone metastasesProstate cancer223RaRadiumRadionuclide therapyAlpharadin

Supplementary material

259_2013_2427_MOESM1_ESM.docx (252 kb)
ESM 1(DOCX 252 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge A. Carrasquillo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joseph A. O’Donoghue
    • 3
  • Neeta Pandit-Taskar
    • 1
    • 2
  • John L. Humm
    • 3
  • Dana E. Rathkopf
    • 4
    • 5
  • Susan F. Slovin
    • 4
    • 5
  • Matthew J. Williamson
    • 3
  • Kristine Lacuna
    • 4
  • Anne-Kirsti Aksnes
    • 6
  • Steven M. Larson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard I. Scher
    • 4
    • 5
  • Michael J. Morris
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of RadiologyMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyWeill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical PhysicsMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Genitourinary Oncology Service, Department of MedicineMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineWeill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Algeta ASAOsloNorway