European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 213–227

European multicentre database of healthy controls for [123I]FP-CIT SPECT (ENC-DAT): age-related effects, gender differences and evaluation of different methods of analysis

  • Andrea Varrone
  • John C. Dickson
  • Livia Tossici-Bolt
  • Terez Sera
  • Susanne Asenbaum
  • Jan Booij
  • Ozlem L. Kapucu
  • Andreas Kluge
  • Gitte M. Knudsen
  • Pierre Malick Koulibaly
  • Flavio Nobili
  • Marco Pagani
  • Osama Sabri
  • Thierry Vander Borght
  • Koen Van Laere
  • Klaus Tatsch
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00259-012-2276-8

Cite this article as:
Varrone, A., Dickson, J.C., Tossici-Bolt, L. et al. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging (2013) 40: 213. doi:10.1007/s00259-012-2276-8

Abstract

Purpose

Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [123I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) is an established diagnostic tool in parkinsonism and dementia. Although qualitative assessment criteria are available, DAT quantification is important for research and for completion of a diagnostic evaluation. One critical aspect of quantification is the availability of normative data, considering possible age and gender effects on DAT availability. The aim of the European Normal Control Database of DaTSCAN (ENC-DAT) study was to generate a large database of [123I]FP-CIT SPECT scans in healthy controls.

Methods

SPECT data from 139 healthy controls (74 men, 65 women; age range 20 – 83 years, mean 53 years) acquired in 13 different centres were included. Images were reconstructed using the ordered-subset expectation-maximization algorithm without correction (NOACSC), with attenuation correction (AC), and with both attenuation and scatter correction using the triple-energy window method (ACSC). Region-of-interest analysis was performed using the BRASS software (caudate and putamen), and the Southampton method (striatum). The outcome measure was the specific binding ratio (SBR).

Results

A significant effect of age on SBR was found for all data. Gender had a significant effect on SBR in the caudate and putamen for the NOACSC and AC data, and only in the left caudate for the ACSC data (BRASS method). Significant effects of age and gender on striatal SBR were observed for all data analysed with the Southampton method. Overall, there was a significant age-related decline in SBR of between 4 % and 6.7 % per decade.

Conclusion

This study provides a large database of [123I]FP-CIT SPECT scans in healthy controls across a wide age range and with balanced gender representation. Higher DAT availability was found in women than in men. An average age-related decline in DAT availability of 5.5 % per decade was found for both genders, in agreement with previous reports. The data collected in this study may serve as a reference database for nuclear medicine centres and for clinical trials using [123I]FP-CIT SPECT as the imaging marker.

Keywords

Dopamine transporterGender differenceAge effectsSPECTScatter correctionDatabase

Supplementary material

259_2012_2276_MOESM1_ESM.jpg (3 mb)
Supplementary Figure 1Age distribution for males (A) and females (B) included in each centre (listed in alphabetical order). The gamma-camera system used for the SPECT acquisition is in parenthesis. (JPEG 3033 kb)
259_2012_2276_MOESM2_ESM.jpg (3.1 mb)
ESM 1(JPEG 3178 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Varrone
    • 1
  • John C. Dickson
    • 2
  • Livia Tossici-Bolt
    • 3
  • Terez Sera
    • 4
  • Susanne Asenbaum
    • 5
  • Jan Booij
    • 6
  • Ozlem L. Kapucu
    • 7
  • Andreas Kluge
    • 8
  • Gitte M. Knudsen
    • 9
  • Pierre Malick Koulibaly
    • 10
  • Flavio Nobili
    • 11
  • Marco Pagani
    • 12
    • 13
  • Osama Sabri
    • 14
  • Thierry Vander Borght
    • 15
  • Koen Van Laere
    • 16
  • Klaus Tatsch
    • 17
  1. 1.Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry ResearchKarolinska University Hospital, R5:02StockholmSweden
  2. 2.Institute of Nuclear MedicineUCLH NHS Foundation Trust and University CollegeLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Medical PhysicsUniversity Hospitals Southampton NHS TrustSouthamptonUK
  4. 4.Department of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic SzegedUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  5. 5.Department of Nuclear MedicineMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  6. 6.Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical CentreUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamNetherlands
  7. 7.Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of MedicineGazi UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  8. 8.ABX-CRODresdenGermany
  9. 9.Neurobiology Research UnitRigshospitalet and University of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark
  10. 10.Nuclear Medicine Department, Centre Antoine LacassagneUniversity of Nice-Sophia AntipolisNiceFrance
  11. 11.Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and GeneticsUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly
  12. 12.Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNRRomeItaly
  13. 13.Department of Nuclear MedicineKarolinska University HospitalStockholmSweden
  14. 14.Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity of LeipzigLeipzigGermany
  15. 15.Nuclear Medicine Division, Mont-Godinne Medical CenterUniversité Catholique de LouvainYvoirBelgium
  16. 16.Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital and K.U. LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  17. 17.Department of Nuclear MedicineMunicipal Hospital of Karlsruhe IncKarlsruheGermany