European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

, Volume 33, Issue 12, pp 1432–1441

Successful high-resolution animal positron emission tomography of human Ewing tumours and their metastases in a murine xenograft model

Authors

    • Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Marc Hotfilder
    • Department of Pediatric Hematology and OncologyUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Christopher Poremba
    • Institute of PathologyHeinrich-Heine-University
  • Sven Hermann
    • Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Klaus Schäfers
    • Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Helmut Erich Gabbert
    • Institute of PathologyHeinrich-Heine-University
  • Heribert Jürgens
    • Department of Pediatric Hematology and OncologyUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Otmar Schober
    • Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Michael Schäfers
    • Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Münster
  • Josef Vormoor
    • Department of Pediatric Hematology and OncologyUniversity Hospital Münster
    • Northern Institute for Cancer ResearchUniversity of Newcastle upon Tyne
Original article

DOI: 10.1007/s00259-006-0106-6

Cite this article as:
Franzius, C., Hotfilder, M., Poremba, C. et al. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging (2006) 33: 1432. doi:10.1007/s00259-006-0106-6

Abstract

Purpose

As primary osseous metastasis is the main adverse prognostic factor in patients with Ewing tumours, a NOD/scid mouse model for human Ewing tumour metastases has been established to examine the mechanisms of metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diagnostic molecular imaging by small animal PET in this mouse model.

Methods

Human Ewing tumour cells were transplanted into immune-deficient NOD/scid mice via s.c injection (n=17) or i.v. injection (n=17). The animals (mean weight 23.2 g) were studied 2–7 weeks after transplantation using a submillimetre resolution animal PET scanner. To assess glucose utilisation and bone metabolism, mice were scanned after intravenous injection of 9.6 MBq (mean) 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) or 9.4 MBq (mean) [18F]fluoride. Whole-body PET images were analysed visually and semi-quantitatively [%ID/g, tumour to non-tumour ratio (T/NT)]. Foci of pathological uptake were identified with respect to the physiological organ uptake in corresponding regions.

Results

Subcutaneously transplanted Ewing tumours demonstrated a moderately increased glucose uptake (median %ID/g 2.5; median T/NT 2.2). After i.v. transplantation, the pattern of metastasis was similar to that in patients with metastases in lung, bone and soft tissue. These metastases showed an increased FDG uptake (median %ID/g 3.6; median T/NT 2.7). Osseous metastases were additionally visible on [18F]fluoride PET by virtue of decreased [18F]fluoride uptake (osteolysis; median %ID/g 8.4; median T/NT 0.59). Metastases were confirmed immunohistologically.

Conclusion

Diagnostic molecular imaging of Ewing tumours and their small metastases in an in vivo NOD/scid mouse model is feasible using a submillimetre resolution PET scanner.

Keywords

Small animal PETFDG[18F]fluorideEwing tumoursMouse model

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006