Skeletal Radiology

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 371–377

Ultrasound-guided autologous blood injection for tennis elbow

  • David A. Connell
  • Kaline E. Ali
  • Muaaze Ahmad
  • Simon Lambert
  • Steven Corbett
  • Mark Curtis
Scientific Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00256-006-0081-9

Cite this article as:
Connell, D.A., Ali, K.E., Ahmad, M. et al. Skeletal Radiol (2006) 35: 371. doi:10.1007/s00256-006-0081-9

Abstract

Objective

To assess the efficacy of autologous blood injection under sonographic guidance for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

Design and Patients

Thirty-five patients (23 men, 12 women, mean age 40.9) with refractory lateral epicondylitis (mean symptom duration 13.8 months) underwent sonographic evaluation prior to dry-needling the tendon and injection with autologous blood. Patients were reviewed, and measures of Nirschl and Visual Analogue Scores (VAS) were taken pre-procedure and post-procedure, at 4 weeks and 6 months.

Results

Following autologous blood injections, significant reductions were reported for Nirschl scores, which decreased from a median (inter-quartile range) pre-procedure score of 6 (6–7), to 4 (2–5) at 4 weeks (p<0.001), and to 0 (0–1) at 6 months (p<0.001). Similarly, significant reductions were reported for VAS scores from a median (inter-quartile range) pre-procedure score of 9 (8–10), to 6 (3–8) at 4 weeks (p<0.001), and to 0 (0–1) at 6 months (p<0.001). Sonography demonstrated a reduction in the total number of interstitial cleft formations and anechoic foci; a significant reduction in tendon thickness from a mean (SD) of 5.15 mm (0.79) at baseline to 4.82 mm (0.62) at 6 months post-procedure (p<0.001) was observed. Hypoechoic change significantly reduced from a median (inter-quartile range) of 7 (6–7) at baseline to 2 (1–3) at 6 months post-procedure (p<0.001). Neovascularity also significantly decreased from a median (inter-quartile range) of 6 (4–7) at baseline to 1 (0–3) at 6 months post-procedure (p<0.001), although sonographic abnormality remained in many asymptomatic patients.

Conclusions

Autologous blood injection is a primary technique for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Sonography can be used to guide injections and monitor changes to the common extensor origin.

Keywords

Ultrasound Autologous blood Lateral epicondylitis Dry needling Treatment Tendon healing 

Copyright information

© ISS 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Connell
    • 1
  • Kaline E. Ali
    • 1
  • Muaaze Ahmad
    • 1
  • Simon Lambert
    • 1
  • Steven Corbett
    • 2
  • Mark Curtis
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyRoyal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS TrustStanmoreUK
  2. 2.Guy’s & St. Thomas’ NHS TrustLondonUK
  3. 3.Kingston Hospital NHS TrustKingston upon ThamesUK

Personalised recommendations