Environmental Geology

, Volume 57, Issue 7, pp 1537–1551

CO2 source-sink matching in the lower 48 United States, with examples from the Texas Gulf Coast and Permian Basin

  • W. A. Ambrose
  • C. Breton
  • M. H. Holtz
  • V. Núñez-López
  • S. D. Hovorka
  • I. J. Duncan
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00254-008-1430-x

Cite this article as:
Ambrose, W.A., Breton, C., Holtz, M.H. et al. Environ Geol (2009) 57: 1537. doi:10.1007/s00254-008-1430-x

Abstract

Documenting geographic distribution and spatial linkages between CO2 sources and potential sinks in areas with significant levels of CO2 emissions is important when considering carbon-management strategies such as geologic sequestration or enhanced oil recovery (EOR). For example, the US Gulf Coast overlies a thick succession (>6,000 m [>20,000 ft]) of highly porous and permeable sandstone formations separated by thick, regionally extensive shale aquitards. The Gulf Coast and Permian Basin also have a large potential for EOR, in which CO2 injected into suitable oil reservoirs could be followed by long-term storage of CO2 in nonproductive formations below reservoir intervals. For example, >6 billion barrels (Bbbl) of oil from 182 large reservoirs is technically recoverable in the Permian Basin as a result of miscible-CO2 flooding. The Gulf Coast also contains an additional 4.5 Bbbl of oil that could be produced by using miscible CO2. Although the CO2 pipeline infrastructure is well-developed in the Permian Basin, east Texas and the Texas Gulf Coast may have a greater long-term potential for deep, permanent storage of CO2 because of thick brine-bearing formations near both major subsurface and point sources of CO2.

Keywords

Global warming Geology GIS Petroleum geology Water resources 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. Ambrose
    • 1
  • C. Breton
    • 1
  • M. H. Holtz
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. Núñez-López
    • 1
    • 3
  • S. D. Hovorka
    • 1
  • I. J. Duncan
    • 1
  1. 1.Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic GeologyJohn A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Praxair, Inc.HoustonUSA
  3. 3.Chevron CorporationSan RamonUSA

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