Environmental Geology

, 54:1619

Geologic factors controlling CO2 storage capacity and permanence: case studies based on experience with heterogeneity in oil and gas reservoirs applied to CO2 storage

Authors

    • Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of GeosciencesThe University of Texas at Austin
  • S. Lakshminarasimhan
    • Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of GeosciencesThe University of Texas at Austin
  • M. H. Holtz
    • Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of GeosciencesThe University of Texas at Austin
  • V. Núñez-López
    • Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of GeosciencesThe University of Texas at Austin
  • S. D. Hovorka
    • Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of GeosciencesThe University of Texas at Austin
  • I. Duncan
    • Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of GeosciencesThe University of Texas at Austin
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00254-007-0940-2

Cite this article as:
Ambrose, W.A., Lakshminarasimhan, S., Holtz, M.H. et al. Environ Geol (2008) 54: 1619. doi:10.1007/s00254-007-0940-2

Abstract

A variety of structural and stratigraphic factors control geological heterogeneity, inferred to influence both sequestration capacity and effectiveness, as well as seal capacity. Structural heterogeneity factors include faults, folds, and fracture intensity. Stratigraphic heterogeneity is primarily controlled by the geometry of depositional facies and sandbody continuity, which controls permeability structure. The permeability structure, in turn, has implications for CO2 injectivity and near-term migration pathways, whereas the long-term sequestration capacity can be inferred from the production history. Examples of Gulf Coast oil and gas reservoirs with differing styles of stratigraphic heterogeneity demonstrate the impact of facies variability on fluid flow and CO2 sequestration potential. Beach and barrier-island deposits in West Ranch field in southeast Texas are homogeneous and continuous. In contrast, Seeligson and Stratton fields in south Texas, examples of major heterogeneity in fluvial systems, are composed of discontinuous, channel-fill sandstones confined to narrow, sinuous belts. These heterogeneous deposits contain limited compartments for potential CO2 storage, although CO2 sequestration effectiveness may be enhanced by the high number of intraformational shale beds. These field examples demonstrate that areas for CO2 storage can be optimized by assessing sites for enhanced oil and gas recovery in mature hydrocarbon provinces.

Keywords

CO2 sequestrationCO2 sealsFacies heterogeneitySandbody geometryUS oil and gas reservoirs

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007