Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 45, Issue 6, pp 817–821

The effect of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract on the anaerobic fungi Neocallimastix frontalis EB 188, Piromyces communis DC 193 and Orpinomyces ssp. RW 206: generalized effects and component analysis

  • E. G. Harper
  • R. P. Welch
  • D. Contreras Lara
  • J. S. Chang
  • R. E. Calza
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002530050768

Cite this article as:
Harper, E., Welch, R., Lara, D. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (1996) 45: 817. doi:10.1007/s002530050768

Abstract

Three fungi Neocallimastix frontalis EB 188, Piromyces communis DC 193 and Orpinomyces ssp. RW 206, representing the predominant cultures isolated from cattle, were shown to respond to the addition of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract (i.e., Amaferm; BioZyme Inc., St. Joseph, Mo.) stimulation. Growth rates, protein and cellulase secretion and fungal mass production were all accelerated in the presence of the extract. Analysis of volatile fatty acids produced by these three species suggested that extract addition increased and altered gas production. Fractionation and preliminary analysis of the components present in the soluble extract, which stimulated the growth of the cellulolytic fungus N. frontalis EB 188, were also attempted. Soluble and filtered, sterilized extract was treated prior to use as a stimulant. Pretreatments included dialysis, ultraviolet irradiation, freeze thaw cycling, boiling, autoclaving, digestion with protease, autodigestion, organic extraction, decolorizing-carbon binding and polyethylene glycol concentration. Boiling, protease treatment, organic extraction, freeze thaw cycling and decolorizing-carbon binding reduced the ability of the extract to stimulate fungal cultures. Gel electrophoresis methods demonstrated that protein- and cellulasesecretion profiles were not identical in control and stimulated cultures. High-performance liquid chromatography methods allowed the separation of the extract into a limited number of ultraviolet-absorbing peaks, of which several stimulated the physiology of the fungus.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. G. Harper
    • 1
  • R. P. Welch
    • 1
  • D. Contreras Lara
    • 1
  • J. S. Chang
    • 1
  • R. E. Calza
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-6320, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6320, USAUS