Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 45, Issue 6, pp 811–816

The effect of Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract on the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis EB 188: effects on physiology

Authors

  • R. P. Welch
    • Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-6320, USA
  • K.-P. Tsai
    • Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-6320, USA
  • E. G. Harper
    • Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-6320, USA
  • J. S. Chang
    • Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-6320, USA
  • R. E. Calza
    • Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164–6320, USA
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002530050767

Cite this article as:
Welch, R., Tsai, K., Harper, E. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (1996) 45: 811. doi:10.1007/s002530050767

Abstract

Aspergillus oryzae fermentation extract (Amaferm) was used to stimulate the in vitro growth of the cellulolytic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis EB 188. Soluble and filter-sterilized extract was added either at the start or throughout culture growth. Culture mass, protein secretion and cellulase secretion were measured in stationary test-tubes or round-bottom flasks and a stirred (desktop) fermenter. The soluble extract increased culture mass and protein and cellulase secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum stimulation caused the supernatant cellulase to nearly double (i.e., 87% over controls; P<0.05), cell mass increased by 27% (P<0.05) over controls and secreted protein increased 37% (P<0.05) over controls. The timing of extract addition did not alter the culture response and suggested a recycling of components. The robustness of fungal zoospores used as inoculum, however, greatly influenced the effectiveness of the extract to stimulate secretions. Extracts did not directly influence the pH of the culture medium or the endogenous levels of enzymes. The rate of carbon source utilization and morphology of the fungus were unchanged by soluble-extract additions at any level tested. The extract was inhibitory when added to concentrations exceeding an amount equivalent to 20 g animal-1 day-1.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996