Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 97, Issue 12, pp 5215–5224

Potential and limitations of Burgundy truffle cultivation

  • Ulrich Stobbe
  • Simon Egli
  • Willy Tegel
  • Martina Peter
  • Ludger Sproll
  • Ulf Büntgen
Mini-Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-013-4956-0

Cite this article as:
Stobbe, U., Egli, S., Tegel, W. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2013) 97: 5215. doi:10.1007/s00253-013-4956-0

Abstract

Burgundy truffles (Tuber aestivum syn. Tuber uncinatum) are the highly prized fruit bodies of subterranean fungi always occurring in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with host plants. Successful cultivation can be achieved through artificial mycorrhization and outplanting of mostly oaks and hazel on suitable terrain. Here, we review ecological requirements, the influence of environmental factors, and the importance of molecular techniques for a successful cultivation of T. aestivum across Europe. The historical background and current knowledge of T. aestivum cultivation are discussed in light of its socioeconomic relevance.

Keywords

Truffle cultivationTuber aestivumBurgundy truffleEcological rangeMolecular methods

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulrich Stobbe
    • 1
  • Simon Egli
    • 3
  • Willy Tegel
    • 2
  • Martina Peter
    • 3
  • Ludger Sproll
    • 1
  • Ulf Büntgen
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Forest Botany and Tree PhysiologyUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.Institute for Forest Growth IWWUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  3. 3.Swiss Federal Research Institute WSLBirmensdorfSwitzerland
  4. 4.Oeschger Centre for Climate Change ResearchBernSwitzerland