Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 87, Issue 2, pp 703–713

Cg2091 encodes a polyphosphate/ATP-dependent glucokinase of Corynebacterium glutamicum

  • Steffen N. Lindner
  • Sandra Knebel
  • Srinivas R. Pallerla
  • Siegfried M. Schoberth
  • Volker F. Wendisch
Applied Microbial and Cell Physiology

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-010-2568-5

Cite this article as:
Lindner, S.N., Knebel, S., Pallerla, S.R. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2010) 87: 703. doi:10.1007/s00253-010-2568-5
  • 318 Views

Abstract

The Corynebacterium glutamicum gene cg2091 is encoding a polyphosphate (PolyP)/ATP-dependent glucokinase (PPGK). Previous work demonstrated the association of PPGK to PolyP granules. The deduced amino acid sequence of PPGK shows 45% sequence identity to PolyP/ATP glucomannokinase of Arthrobacter sp. strain KM and 50% sequence identity to PolyP glucokinase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. PPGK from C. glutamicum was purified from recombinant Escherichia coli. PolyP was highly preferred over ATP and other NTPs as substrate and with respect to the tested PolyPs differing in chain length; the protein was most active with PolyP75. Gel filtration analysis revealed that PolyP supported the formation of homodimers of PPGK and that PPGK was active as a homodimer. A ppgK deletion mutant (ΔppgK) showed slowed growth in minimal medium with maltose as sole carbon source. Moreover, in minimal medium containing 2 to 4% (w/v) glucose as carbon source, ΔppgK grew to lower final biomass concentrations than the wild type. Under phosphate starvation conditions, growth of ΔppgK was reduced, and growth of a ppgK overexpressing strain was increased as compared to wild type and empty vector control, respectively. Thus, under conditions of glucose excess, the presence of PPGK entailed a growth advantage.

Keyword

CorynebacteriumGlucokinasePolyphosphatePoly PMaltosePhosphate starvation

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steffen N. Lindner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sandra Knebel
    • 2
  • Srinivas R. Pallerla
    • 2
  • Siegfried M. Schoberth
    • 2
  • Volker F. Wendisch
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Molecular Microbiology and BiotechnologyWestfalian Wilhelms University MünsterMünsterGermany
  2. 2.Institut für Biotechnologie 1Forschungszentrum JülichJülichGermany
  3. 3.Faculty of BiologyBielefeld UniversityBielefeldGermany