Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 83, Issue 5, pp 925–937

Effect of ultrafine-grained titanium surfaces on adhesion of bacteria

  • Vi Khanh Truong
  • Stuart Rundell
  • Rimma Lapovok
  • Yuri Estrin
  • James Y. Wang
  • Christopher C. Berndt
  • David G. Barnes
  • Christopher J. Fluke
  • Russell J. Crawford
  • Elena P. Ivanova
Applied Microbial and Cell Physiology

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-009-1944-5

Cite this article as:
Truong, V.K., Rundell, S., Lapovok, R. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2009) 83: 925. doi:10.1007/s00253-009-1944-5

Abstract

The influence of the ultrafine crystallinity of commercial purity grade 2 (as-received) titanium and titanium modified by equal channel angular pressing (modified titanium) on bacterial attachment was studied. A topographic profile analysis of the surface of the modified titanium revealed a complex morphology of the surface. Its prominent micro- and nano-scale features were 100–200-nm-scale undulations with 10–15 μm spacing. The undulating surfaces were nano-smooth, with height variations not exceeding 5–10 nm. These surface topography characteristics were distinctly different from those of the as-received samples, where broad valleys (up to 40–60 μm) were detected, whose inner surfaces exhibited asperities approximately 100 nm in height spaced at 1–2 μm. It was found that each of the three bacteria strains used in this study as adsorbates, viz. Staphylococcus aureus CIP 68.5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9025 and Escherichia coli K12, responded differently to the two types of titanium surfaces. Extreme grain refinement by ECAP resulted in substantially increased numbers of cells attached to the surface compared to as-received titanium. This enhanced degree of attachment was accompanied with an increased level of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production by the bacteria.

Keywords

Titanium surfacesEqual channel angular pressing (ECAP)Bacterial adhesionStaphylococcus aureusPseudomonas aeruginosaEscherichia coli

Supplementary material

253_2009_1944_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.7 mb)
ESM 1Three-dimensional projections of CLSM images of representative S. aureus specimens on the as-received (left) and modified (right) titanium surfaces after 18-h incubation. Bacterial colonies (stained red with Rhodamine Red-X) produce EPS (stained green with concanavalin A Alexa 488) across the plate surface. Readers using version 8.0 or higher of Acrobat Reader can enable interactive, three-dimensional views of the data by clicking on the figure panels. Once enabled, 3-d mode allows the reader to rotate and zoom the view using the computer mouse (PDF 1.7 MB)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vi Khanh Truong
    • 1
  • Stuart Rundell
    • 2
  • Rimma Lapovok
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yuri Estrin
    • 2
    • 3
  • James Y. Wang
    • 4
  • Christopher C. Berndt
    • 4
  • David G. Barnes
    • 5
  • Christopher J. Fluke
    • 5
  • Russell J. Crawford
    • 1
  • Elena P. Ivanova
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Life and Social SciencesSwinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Materials EngineeringMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia
  3. 3.ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light MetalsClaytonAustralia
  4. 4.IRIS, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial SciencesSwinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia
  5. 5.Centre for Astrophysics and SupercomputingSwinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia