Immunogenetics

, Volume 49, Issue 10, pp 835–842

The complete primary structure of mouse 20S proteasomes

  • Laura A. Elenich
  • D. Nandi
  • A. Elizabeth Kent
  • T. Scott McCluskey
  • M. Cruz
  • Mohan N. Iyer
  • Elaine C. Woodward
  • Christopher W. Conn
  • Amber L. Ochoa
  • David B. Ginsburg
  • J. J. Monaco
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002510050562

Cite this article as:
Elenich, L., Nandi, D., Kent, A. et al. Immunogenetics (1999) 49: 835. doi:10.1007/s002510050562

Abstract

 The proteasome is a large multicatalytic proteinase that plays a role in the generation of peptides for presentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. The 20S proteolytic core of mammalian proteasomes is assembled from a group of 17 protein subunits that generate a distinctive pattern of spots upon two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The genes for most of these subunits have been cloned from humans and rats. We isolated cDNA clones for the mouse orthologues of ten of the subunits [PSMA1 (C2), PSMA2 (C3), PSMA3 (C8), PSMA4 (C9), PSMA5 (ZETA), PSMA6 (IOTA), PSMA7 (C6-I), PSMB2 (C7-I), PSMB3 (C10-II), and PSMB5 (X)] to complete the cloning of all of the mouse subunits. Using antisera raised against these subunits or their orthologues, we verified the identity of these proteins by two-dimensional NEPHGE-PAGE.

Key words Proteasome Antigen processing Multicatalytic proteinase Proteolysis Protein degradation 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura A. Elenich
    • 1
  • D. Nandi
    • 1
  • A. Elizabeth Kent
    • 1
  • T. Scott McCluskey
    • 1
  • M. Cruz
    • 1
  • Mohan N. Iyer
    • 1
  • Elaine C. Woodward
    • 2
  • Christopher W. Conn
    • 1
  • Amber L. Ochoa
    • 1
  • David B. Ginsburg
    • 1
  • J. J. Monaco
    • 1
  1. 1.Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Departments of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Cincinnati, 231 Bethesda Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0524, USA e-mail: monacojj@ucmail.uc.edu, Tel.: +1-513-5585521, Fax: +1-513-5585530MC
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0678, USAUS

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