Immunogenetics

, Volume 66, Issue 6, pp 411–426

Unusual evolutionary conservation and further species-specific adaptations of a large family of nonclassical MHC class Ib genes across different degrees of genome ploidy in the amphibian subfamily Xenopodinae

  • Eva-Stina Edholm
  • Ana Goyos
  • Joseph Taran
  • Francisco De Jesús Andino
  • Yuko Ohta
  • Jacques Robert
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00251-014-0774-5

Cite this article as:
Edholm, ES., Goyos, A., Taran, J. et al. Immunogenetics (2014) 66: 411. doi:10.1007/s00251-014-0774-5
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Abstract

Nonclassical MHC class Ib (class Ib) genes are a family of highly diverse and rapidly evolving genes wherein gene numbers, organization, and expression markedly differ even among closely related species rendering class Ib phylogeny difficult to establish. Whereas among mammals there are few unambiguous class Ib gene orthologs, different amphibian species belonging to the anuran subfamily Xenopodinae exhibit an unusually high degree of conservation among multiple class Ib gene lineages. Comparative genomic analysis of class Ib gene loci of two divergent (~65 million years) Xenopodinae subfamily members Xenopus laevis (allotetraploid) and Xenopus tropicalis (diploid) shows that both species possess a large cluster of class Ib genes denoted as Xenopus/Silurana nonclassical (XNC/SNC). Our study reveals two distinct phylogenetic patterns among these genes: some gene lineages display a high degree of flexibility, as demonstrated by species-specific expansion and contractions, whereas other class Ib gene lineages have been maintained as monogenic subfamilies with very few changes in their nucleotide sequence across divergent species. In this second category, we further investigated the XNC/SNC10 gene lineage that in X. laevis is required for the development of a distinct semi-invariant T cell population. We report compelling evidence of the remarkable high degree of conservation of this gene lineage that is present in all 12 species of the Xenopodinae examined, including species with different degrees of ploidy ranging from 2, 4, 8 to 12 N. This suggests that the critical role of XNC10 during early T cell development is conserved in amphibians.

Keywords

Amphibians Xenopus XNC/SNC Class I like MHC evolution XNC10 

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva-Stina Edholm
    • 1
  • Ana Goyos
    • 2
  • Joseph Taran
    • 1
  • Francisco De Jesús Andino
    • 1
  • Yuko Ohta
    • 3
  • Jacques Robert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of Structural BiologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Maryland at BaltimoreBaltimoreUSA

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