Immunogenetics

, Volume 53, Issue 10, pp 930–940

Nucleotide sequence of the MHC class I genomic region of a teleost, the medaka (Oryzias latipes)

  • Megumi Y. Matsuo
  • Shuichi Asakawa
  • Nobuyoshi Shimizu
  • Hiroshi Kimura
  • Masaru Nonaka
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00251-001-0427-3

Cite this article as:
Matsuo, M.Y., Asakawa, S., Shimizu, N. et al. Immunogenetics (2002) 53: 930. doi:10.1007/s00251-001-0427-3

Abstract.

Teleost orthologs of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded genes show a dispersed distribution over several chromosomal loci. However, some of them, including the MHC class I alpha chain genes, are tightly linked to each other, forming the teleost MHC class I region. To elucidate the evolution of vertebrate MHC, we have determined the complete nucleotide sequences of two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, encompassing the MHC class I region of the inbred Hd-rR strain of the medaka (Oryzias latipes). The 425862 bp nucleotide sequence predicted 20 possibly expressed genes and three pseudogenes. Except for one gene, CIZ, whose human ortholog is located at 12p13.31, all identified genes were orthologs or closely related relatives of the human MHC-encoded genes. Two classical class I alpha chain genes and the six other genes directly involved in class I antigen presentation formed an uninterrupted cluster. Comparison of the MHC class I region genes among three teleost species, the medaka, zebrafish and pufferfish, indicated that the content, but not the order or transcriptional orientation, of the genes is highly conserved. These results suggest that a strong selective pressure has conserved the linkage of certain MHC genes during vertebrate evolution, despite recurrent genetic rearrangements.

Major histocompatibility complex Evolution Class I Full genome analysis Teleost

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Megumi Y. Matsuo
    • 1
  • Shuichi Asakawa
    • 2
  • Nobuyoshi Shimizu
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Kimura
    • 3
  • Masaru Nonaka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
  2. 2.Department of Molecular Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan
  3. 3.Department of Experimental Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192, Japan