Microbial Ecology

, Volume 65, Issue 4, pp 1052–1067

Temporal and Spatial Distribution Patterns of Potentially Pathogenic Vibrio spp. at Recreational Beaches of the German North Sea

  • Simone I. Böer
  • Ernst-August Heinemeyer
  • Katrin Luden
  • René Erler
  • Gunnar Gerdts
  • Frank Janssen
  • Nicole Brennholt
Environmental Microbiology

DOI: 10.1007/s00248-013-0221-4

Cite this article as:
Böer, S.I., Heinemeyer, EA., Luden, K. et al. Microb Ecol (2013) 65: 1052. doi:10.1007/s00248-013-0221-4

Abstract

The number of reported Vibrio-related wound infections associated with recreational bathing in Northern Europe has increased within the last decades. In order to study the health risk from potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in the central Wadden Sea, the seasonal and spatial distribution of Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio cholerae were investigated at ten recreational beaches in this area over a 2-year period. V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were found to be omnipresent all year round in the study area, while V. vulnificus occurrence was restricted to summer months in the estuaries of the rivers Ems and Weser. Multiple linear regression models revealed that water temperature is the most important determinant of Vibrio spp. occurrence in the area. Differentiated regression models showed a species-specific response to water temperature and revealed a particularly strong effect of even minor temperature increases on the probability of detecting V. vulnificus in summer. In sediments, Vibrio spp. concentrations were up to three orders of magnitude higher than in water. Also, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were found to be less susceptible towards winter temperatures in the benthic environment than in the water, indicating an important role of sediments for Vibrio ecology. While only a very small percentage of tested V. parahaemolyticus proved to be potentially pathogenic, the presence of V. vulnificus during the summer months should be regarded with care.

Supplementary material

248_2013_221_MOESM1_ESM.doc (310 kb)
ESM 1(DOC 309 kb)
248_2013_221_MOESM2_ESM.doc (64 kb)
ESM 2(DOC 64 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simone I. Böer
    • 1
  • Ernst-August Heinemeyer
    • 2
  • Katrin Luden
    • 2
  • René Erler
    • 3
  • Gunnar Gerdts
    • 3
  • Frank Janssen
    • 4
  • Nicole Brennholt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department G3—Bio-Chemistry, EcotoxicologyFederal Institute of HydrologyKoblenzGermany
  2. 2.Governmental Institute for Public Health of Lower SaxonyAurichGermany
  3. 3.Biological Institute Helgoland, Division of Shelf Seas Systems EcologyAlfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine ResearchHelgolandGermany
  4. 4.Federal Maritime and Hydrographic AgencyHamburgGermany