Neuroradiology

, Volume 47, Issue 7, pp 501–506

Cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using the Stroop task

Authors

    • Department of NeurosurgeryGifu University School of Medicine
  • Toshihiko Nakashima
    • Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Department of NeurosurgeryKizawa Memorial Hospital
  • Ayumi Okumura
    • Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Department of NeurosurgeryKizawa Memorial Hospital
  • Kazuo Kuwata
    • Department of Biochemistry and BiophysicsGifu University School of Medicine
  • Jun Shinoda
    • Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Department of NeurosurgeryKizawa Memorial Hospital
  • Toru Iwama
    • Department of NeurosurgeryGifu University School of Medicine
Diagnostic Neuroradiology

DOI: 10.1007/s00234-005-1372-x

Cite this article as:
Soeda, A., Nakashima, T., Okumura, A. et al. Neuroradiology (2005) 47: 501. doi:10.1007/s00234-005-1372-x

Abstract

The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a key role in cognition, motor function, and emotion processing. However, little is known about how traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the ACC system. Our purpose was to compare, by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the patterns of cortical activation in patients with cognitive impairment after TBI and those of normal subjects. Cortical activation maps of 11 right-handed healthy control subjects and five TBI patients with cognitive impairment were recorded in response to a Stroop task during a block-designed fMRI experiment. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used for individual subjects and group analysis. In TBI patients and controls, cortical activation, found in similar regions of the frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes, resembled patterns of activation documented in previous neuroimaging studies of the Stroop task in healthy controls. However, the TBI patients showed a relative decrease in ACC activity compared with the controls. Cognitive impairment in TBI patients seems to be associated with alterations in functional cerebral activity, especially less activation of the ACC. These changes are probably the result of destruction of neural networks after diffuse axonal injury and may reflect cortical disinhibition attributable to disconnection or compensation for an inefficient cognitive process.

Keywords

Cognitive function Functional MRI Brain injury Stroop task

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005