European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

, Volume 64, Issue 4, pp 357–365

High prevalence of the CYP2B6 516G→T(*6) variant and effect on the population pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in HIV/AIDS outpatients in Zimbabwe

  • Christopher Nyakutira
  • Daniel Röshammar
  • Emmanuel Chigutsa
  • Prosper Chonzi
  • Michael Ashton
  • Charles Nhachi
  • Collen Masimirembwa
Pharmacogenetics

DOI: 10.1007/s00228-007-0412-3

Cite this article as:
Nyakutira, C., Röshammar, D., Chigutsa, E. et al. Eur J Clin Pharmacol (2008) 64: 357. doi:10.1007/s00228-007-0412-3

Abstract

Objective

The study sought to investigate the relationship between efavirenz exposure and the CYP2B6 516G→T(*6) genotype in HIV/AIDS outpatients, using pharmacokinetic modelling and simulation.

Methods

Blood samples where obtained from 74 outpatients treated with a combination regimen including 600 mg efavirenz daily for a duration of at least 3 weeks at clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe. The subjects were genotyped for the major CYP2B6 variant, CYP2B6*6, associated with reduced enzyme activity, using a PCR-RFLP method. Efavirenz plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC-UV. Population pharmacokinetic modelling and simulation of the data were performed in NONMEM VI.

Results

A high allele frequency of the CYP2B6*6 allele of 49% was observed. Efavirenz plasma concentrations were above 4 mg/L in 50% of the patients. Genotype and sex were identified as predictive covariates of efavirenz disposition. Pharmacokinetic parameter estimates indicate that a dose reduction to 400 mg efavirenz per day is possible in patients homozygous for the CYP2B6*6 genotype without compromising therapeutic efficacy.

Conclusion

The CYP2B6*6 allele occurs at a high frequency in people of African origin and is associated with high efavirenz concentrations. Simulations indicate that an a priori 35% dose reduction in homozygous CYP2B6*6 patients would maintain drug exposure within the therapeutic range in this group of patients. Our preliminary results suggest the conduct of a prospective clinical dose optimization study to evaluate the utility of genotype-driven dose adjustment in this population.

Keywords

Efavirenz HIV/AIDS patients CYP2B6 polymorphism Pharmacokinetic modelling NONMEM 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Nyakutira
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniel Röshammar
    • 3
  • Emmanuel Chigutsa
    • 1
    • 4
  • Prosper Chonzi
    • 5
  • Michael Ashton
    • 3
  • Charles Nhachi
    • 2
  • Collen Masimirembwa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DMPK & BACAfrican Institute of Biomedical Science and Technology (AiBST)HarareZimbabwe
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Health SciencesUniversity of ZimbabweHarareZimbabwe
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologySahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg UniversityGöteborgSweden
  4. 4.School of PharmacyUniversity of ZimbabweHarareZimbabwe
  5. 5.Harare City Council Health ServicesHarareZimbabwe

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