Article

Marine Biology

, Volume 130, Issue 2, pp 151-161

Evolutionary relationships of deep-sea hydrothermal vent and cold-water seep clams (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae): results from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I

  • A. S. PeekAffiliated withCenter for Theoretical and Applied Genetics, and Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903-0231, USA
  • , R. G. GustafsonAffiliated withCenter for Theoretical and Applied Genetics, and Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903-0231, USA
  • , R. A. LutzAffiliated withCenter for Theoretical and Applied Genetics, and Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903-0231, USA
  • , R. C. VrijenhoekAffiliated withCenter for Theoretical and Applied Genetics, and Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903-0231, USA

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Abstract

Phylogenetic relationships among vesicomyid clams (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) and their placement within the order Heterodonta were examined using mitochondrial encoded cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA sequences. The presently analyzed vesicomyids represent a recent monophyletic radiation that probably occurred within the Cenozoic. Nucleotide phylogenetic analyses resolved discrete clades that were consistent with currently recognized species: Calyptogena magnifica, C. ponderosa, Ectenagena extenta, C. phaseoliformis, Vesicomya cordata, Calyptogena n. sp. (Gulf of Mexico), C. kaikoi, C. nautilei, C. solidissima and C. soyoae (Type-A). However, specimens variously identified as: V. gigas, C. kilmeri, C. pacifica, and V. lepta comprised two “species complexes”, each composed of multiple evolutionary lineages. Most taxa are limited to hydrothermal-vent or cold-seep habitats, but the “vent” versus “seep” clams do not constitute separate monophyletic groups. Current applications of the generic names Calyptogena, Ectenagena, and Vesicomya are not consistent with phylogenetic inferences.