Marine Biology

, Volume 162, Issue 4, pp 773–781

Wide-ranging phylogeographic structure of invasive red lionfish in the Western Atlantic and Greater Caribbean

  • John S. S. Butterfield
  • Edgardo Díaz-Ferguson
  • Brian R. Silliman
  • Jonathan W. Saunders
  • Dayne Buddo
  • Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni
  • Linda Searle
  • Aarin C. Allen
  • Margaret E. Hunter
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00227-015-2623-y

Cite this article as:
Butterfield, J.S.S., Díaz-Ferguson, E., Silliman, B.R. et al. Mar Biol (2015) 162: 773. doi:10.1007/s00227-015-2623-y

Abstract

The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is an invasive predatory marine fish that has rapidly expanded its presence in the Western Hemisphere. We collected 214 invasive red lionfish samples from nine countries and territories, including seven unpublished locations. To more comprehensively evaluate connectivity, we compiled our d-loop sequence data with 846 published sequences, resulting in 1,060 samples from 14 locations. We found low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.003) and moderate haplotype diversity (h = 0.59). Using haplotype population pairwise ΦST tests, we analyzed possible phylogeographic breaks that were previously proposed based on other reef organisms. We found support for the Bahamas/Turks/Caicos versus Caribbean break (ΦST = 0.12) but not for the Northwestern Caribbean, Eastern Caribbean, or US East Coast versus Bahamas breaks. The Northern Region had higher variation and more haplotypes, supporting introductions of at least five haplotypes to the region. Our wide-ranging samples showed that a lower-frequency haplotype in the Northern Region dominated the Southern Region and suggested multiple introductions, possibly to the south. We tested multiple scenarios of phylogeographic structure with analyses of molecular variance and found support for a Northern and Southern Region split at the Bahamas/Turks/Caicos versus Caribbean break (percentage of variation among regions = 8.49 %). We found that Puerto Rico clustered with the Southern Region more strongly than with the Northern Region, as opposed to previous reports. We also found the rare haplotype H03 for the first time in the southern Caribbean (Panama), indicating that either secondary releases occurred or that the low-frequency haplotypes have had time to disperse to extreme southern Caribbean locations.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (outside the USA) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. S. Butterfield
    • 1
  • Edgardo Díaz-Ferguson
    • 2
  • Brian R. Silliman
    • 3
  • Jonathan W. Saunders
    • 4
  • Dayne Buddo
    • 5
  • Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni
    • 6
  • Linda Searle
    • 7
  • Aarin C. Allen
    • 1
  • Margaret E. Hunter
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Geological SurveySoutheast Ecological Science CenterGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Conservation Genetics LaboratoryWarm SpringsUSA
  3. 3.Department of Marine Ecology and ConservationDuke UniversityBeaufortUSA
  4. 4.Horticultural SciencesUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  5. 5.Centre for Marine SciencesUniversity of the West IndiesDiscovery BayJamaica
  6. 6.Centro de Conservación de Manatíes de Puerto RicoUniversidad Interamericana de Puerto RicoBayamónUSA
  7. 7.ECOMARBelize CityBelize