Marine Biology

, Volume 159, Issue 3, pp 675–687

Population genetic structure of protected allis shad (Alosa alosa) and twaite shad (Alosa fallax)

  • Marc T. Jolly
  • Miran W. Aprahamian
  • Stephen J. Hawkins
  • Peter A. Henderson
  • Rob Hillman
  • Niall O’Maoiléidigh
  • Peter S. Maitland
  • Rayner Piper
  • Martin J. Genner
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00227-011-1845-x

Cite this article as:
Jolly, M.T., Aprahamian, M.W., Hawkins, S.J. et al. Mar Biol (2012) 159: 675. doi:10.1007/s00227-011-1845-x

Abstract

Determining the magnitude of homing behaviour within migratory fish species is essential for their conservation and management. We tested for population genetic structuring in the anadromous alosines, Alosa alosa and A. fallax fallax, to establish fidelity of stocks to spawning grounds in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Considerable genetic differences were present among populations of both species, suggesting strong fidelity to breeding grounds and compatible with homing to natal origins. Moreover, the genetic structure of A. fallax fallax showed a clear pattern of isolation-by-distance, consistent with breeding populations exchanging migrants primarily with neighbouring populations. Spatial genetic differences were on average much greater than temporal differences, indicating relatively stable genetic structure. Comparing anadromous A. fallax fallax populations to the landlocked Killarney shad subspecies, A. fallax killarnensis (Ireland), demonstrated a long history of separation. These results demonstrating regional stock structure within the British Isles will inform practical management of stocks and their spawning habitats.

Supplementary material

227_2011_1845_MOESM1_ESM.doc (122 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 122 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc T. Jolly
    • 1
  • Miran W. Aprahamian
    • 2
  • Stephen J. Hawkins
    • 3
  • Peter A. Henderson
    • 4
  • Rob Hillman
    • 5
  • Niall O’Maoiléidigh
    • 6
  • Peter S. Maitland
    • 7
  • Rayner Piper
    • 8
  • Martin J. Genner
    • 9
  1. 1.The LaboratoryMarine Biological Association of the United KingdomPlymouthUK
  2. 2.Environment Agency, Richard Fairclough HouseWarringtonUK
  3. 3.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  4. 4.PISCES Conservation Ltd.HampshireUK
  5. 5.Environment Agency, Sir John Moore HouseCornwallUK
  6. 6.Farran LaboratoryMarine InstituteMayoIreland
  7. 7.Fish Conservation CentreHaddingtonUK
  8. 8.Emu LimitedHampshireUK
  9. 9.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of BristolBristolUK