Marine Biology

, Volume 146, Issue 5, pp 1039–1049

Patterns in the emergence of green (Chelonia mydas) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) turtle hatchlings from their nests

Authors

    • School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Environmental SustainabilityUniversity of Wales Swansea
  • A. C. Broderick
    • Marine Turtle Research Group, Centre for Ecology and ConservationUniversity of Exeter in Cornwall
  • B. J. Godley
    • Marine Turtle Research Group, Centre for Ecology and ConservationUniversity of Exeter in Cornwall
  • G. C. Hays
    • School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Environmental SustainabilityUniversity of Wales Swansea
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00227-004-1492-6

Cite this article as:
Glen, F., Broderick, A.C., Godley, B.J. et al. Marine Biology (2005) 146: 1039. doi:10.1007/s00227-004-1492-6

Abstract

The emergence patterns of both green (Chelonia mydas) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) turtle hatchlings were observed in great detail over three seasons at Alagadi beach, northern Cyprus. In total, 38 green turtle and 50 loggerhead turtle nests were monitored, accounting for the emergence of 2,807 and 2,259 hatchlings, respectively. We quantified these emergences into 397 green turtle and 302 loggerhead turtle emergence groups. Overall, 85.0% of green turtle and 79.5% of loggerhead turtle groups emerged at night; these accounted for 85.5 and 90.8% of hatchlings, respectively. The remaining emergences were dispersed throughout the day for green turtle nests but confined to the morning in loggerhead turtle nests. Hatchling emergence from individual nests occurred over periods of between 1 and 7 nights, with most hatchlings typically emerging on the first night. Group sizes of green turtles emerging during the day were significantly smaller than those emerging at night. Hatchlings of both species that emerged from nests during the day had longer emergence durations than those that emerged from nests at night only.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004