Wood Science and Technology

, Volume 47, Issue 3, pp 557–569

Location and fate of carboxyl groups in aspen alkaline peroxide-impregnated chemithermomechanical pulp fibres during alkaline peroxide bleaching

Authors

  • Yingjuan Fu
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
  • Yanzhu Guo
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
  • Qinghua Xu
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
  • Zongquan Li
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
  • Na Liu
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
  • Zaiwu Yuan
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
  • Yang Gao
    • Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Technology of Ministry of EducationShandong Polytechnic University, University Park of Science and Technology
Original

DOI: 10.1007/s00226-012-0510-y

Cite this article as:
Fu, Y., Qin, M., Guo, Y. et al. Wood Sci Technol (2013) 47: 557. doi:10.1007/s00226-012-0510-y
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Abstract

The origin and kinetic changes of carboxyl groups in aspen chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP) fibres during alkaline peroxide bleaching were evaluated. The results showed that the major contributors of carboxyl groups in aspen CTMP fibres were the 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, galacturonic acid and the carboxyl groups in oxidized lignin. Alkaline peroxide bleaching could increase the total carboxyl groups, surface charge and dissolved anionic substances. However, the excess degradation by superfluous hydroxide and peroxide could result in the reduction of carboxyl groups in fibres because of the production and dissolution of low-molar-mass substances. The total carboxyl groups from polysaccharides in fibres remained constant, and the increase of carboxyl groups in fibres should result from the carboxyl groups newly formed by the lignin oxidation during peroxide bleaching. Alkaline peroxide bleaching could also result in the removal of a large part of extractives and a small fraction of lignin on the fibre surface.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012