Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 107–111

Factors Affecting Peak Bone Density in Japanese Women

Authors

  • Y.  Fujita
    • Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 3-1-3, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
  • K.  Katsumata
    • Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 3-1-3, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
  • A.  Unno
    • Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 3-1-3, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
  • T.  Tawa
    • Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 3-1-3, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
  • A.  Tokita
    • Department of Pediatrics, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 3-1-3, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan

DOI: 10.1007/s002239900587

Cite this article as:
Fujita, Y., Katsumata, K., Unno, A. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (1999) 64: 107. doi:10.1007/s002239900587

Abstract.

Both genetic and environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the determination of bone density. To clarify the interaction between genetic and environmental factors affecting peak bone mass, we investigated the correlation between bone mineral density (BMD) and physical constitution, vitamin D receptor (VDR) genotype, age, age of menarche, history of menstrual dysfunction, and exercise in 157 healthy young Japanese women. History of exercise and menstrual dysfunction were significant independent predictors of BMD. The VDR genotype also affects peak bone density. Exercise has been shown to increase BMD in a similar way for each VDR genotype including those women who have the particular genotype associated with low bone density. This data indicate that there are complex gene-environmental interactions particularly in relation to menstrual history, exercise, and genetic factors during childhood/adolescence that may have implications for the development of adult BMD in women.

Key words: Vitamin D receptor — Genotype — Peak bone density — Exercise — Menstrual dysfunction.

Copyright information

© 1999 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.