Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 87, Issue 1, pp 44–51

Risk Factors for Cervical and Trochanteric Hip Fractures in Elderly Women: A Population-Based 10-Year Follow-Up Study

Authors

    • Department of Medical Technology, Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of Oulu
    • Department of Sports and Exercise MedicineOulu Deaconess Institute
  • Pasi Pulkkinen
    • Department of Medical Technology, Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of Oulu
  • Juha Korpelainen
    • Department of NeurologyUniversity of Oulu
  • Jorma Heikkinen
    • Osteoporosis ClinicOulu Deaconess Institute
  • Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
    • Institute of Health Sciences, Unit of General PracticeUniversity of Oulu
  • Timo Jämsä
    • Department of Medical Technology, Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of Oulu
    • Department of Diagnostic RadiologyOulu University Hospital
  • Raija Korpelainen
    • Department of Medical Technology, Institute of BiomedicineUniversity of Oulu
    • Department of Sports and Exercise MedicineOulu Deaconess Institute
    • Institute of Health Sciences, Unit of General PracticeUniversity of Oulu
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00223-010-9382-z

Cite this article as:
Jokinen, H., Pulkkinen, P., Korpelainen, J. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (2010) 87: 44. doi:10.1007/s00223-010-9382-z

Abstract

We evaluated the contribution of lifestyle-related factors, calcaneal ultrasound, and radial bone mineral density (BMD) to cervical and trochanteric hip fractures in elderly women in a 10-year population-based cohort study. The study population consisted of 1,681 women (age range 70–73 years). Seventy-two percent (n = 1,222) of them participated in the baseline measurements. Calcaneal ultrasound was assessed with a quantitative ultrasound device. BMD measurements were performed at the distal and ultradistal radius by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Forward stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to find the most predictive variables for hip fracture risk. During the follow-up, 53 of the women had hip fractures, including 32 cervical and 21 trochanteric ones. The fractured women were taller and thinner and had lower calcaneal ultrasound values than those without fractures. High body mass index (BMI) was a protective factor against any hip fractures, while low functional mobility was a risk factor of hip fractures. Specifically, high BMI protected against cervical hip fractures, while low physical activity was a significant predictor of these fractures. Similarly, high BMI protected against trochanteric fractures, whereas low functional mobility and high coffee consumption were significant predictors of trochanteric fractures. Cervical and trochanteric hip fractures seem to have different risk factors. Therefore, fracture type should be taken into account in clinical fracture risk assessment and preventative efforts, including patient counseling. However, the study is not conclusive due to the limited number of observed fractures during follow-up, and the results have to be confirmed in future studies.

Keywords

Fracture typeHip fractureMobilityPeripheral DXAPhysical activityQuantitative ultrasound

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010