Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 86, Issue 3, pp 211–219

Influence of Lifestyle Factors on Quantitative Heel Ultrasound Measurements in Middle-Aged and Elderly Men

Authors

  • Stephen R. Pye
    • ARC Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
  • Vinodh Devakumar
    • ARC Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
  • Steven Boonen
    • Leuven University Division of Geriatric MedicineKatholieke Universiteit Leuven
    • Leuven University Center for Metabolic Bone DiseasesKatholieke Universiteit Leuven
  • Herman Borghs
    • Leuven University Center for Metabolic Bone DiseasesKatholieke Universiteit Leuven
  • Dirk Vanderschueren
    • Leuven University Center for Metabolic Bone DiseasesKatholieke Universiteit Leuven
    • Department of Andrology and EndocrinologyKatholieke Universiteit Leuven
  • Judith E. Adams
    • Clinical Radiology, Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
  • Kate A. Ward
    • Clinical Radiology, Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
    • MRC Human Nutrition Research
  • Gyorgy Bartfai
    • Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and AndrologyAlbert Szent-Gyorgy Medical University
  • Felipe F. Casanueva
    • Department of MedicineSantiago de Compostela University, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago (CHUS)
    • CIBER de Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutricion (CB06/03), Instituto Salud Carlos III
  • Joseph D. Finn
    • ARC Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
  • Gianni Forti
    • Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical PhysiopathologyUniversity of Florence
  • Aleksander Giwercman
    • Reproductive Medicine Centre, Malmö University HospitalUniversity of Lund
  • Thang S. Han
    • Department of EndocrinologyRoyal Free & University College Hospital Medical School, Royal Free Hospital
  • Ilpo T. Huhtaniemi
    • Department of Reproductive BiologyImperial College London
  • Krzysztof Kula
    • Department of Andrology and Reproductive EndocrinologyMedical University of Lodz
  • Michael E. J. Lean
    • Department of Human NutritionUniversity of Glasgow
  • Neil Pendleton
    • Clinical Gerontology, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Hope HospitalThe University of Manchester
  • Margus Punab
    • Andrology UnitUnited Laboratories of Tartu University Clinics
  • Alan J. Silman
    • ARC Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
  • Frederick C. W. Wu
    • Department of Endocrinology, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester Royal InfirmaryThe University of Manchester
    • ARC Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science CentreThe University of Manchester
  • EMAS Study Group
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00223-009-9330-y

Cite this article as:
Pye, S.R., Devakumar, V., Boonen, S. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (2010) 86: 211. doi:10.1007/s00223-009-9330-y

Abstract

We examined the distribution of quantitative heel ultrasound (QUS) parameters in population samples of European men and looked at the influence of lifestyle factors on the occurrence of these parameters. Men aged between 40 and 79 years were recruited from eight European centers and invited to attend for an interviewer-assisted questionnaire, assessment of physical performance, and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneus (Hologic; Sahara). The relationships between QUS parameters and lifestyle variables were assessed using linear regression with adjustments for age, center, and weight. Three thousand two hundred fifty-eight men, mean age 60.0 years, were included in the analysis. A higher PASE score (upper vs. lower tertile) was associated with a higher BUA (β coefficient = 2.44 dB/Mhz), SOS (β = 6.83 m/s), and QUI (β = 3.87). Compared to those who were inactive, those who walked or cycled more than an hour per day had a higher BUA (β = 3.71 dB/Mhz), SOS (β = 6.97 m/s), and QUI (β = 4.50). A longer time to walk 50 ft was linked with a lower BUA (β = −0.62 dB/Mhz), SOS (β = −1.06 m/s), and QUI (β = −0.69). Smoking was associated with a reduction in BUA, SOS, and QUI. There was a U-shaped association with frequency of alcohol consumption. Modification of lifestyle, including increasing physical activity and stopping smoking, may help optimize bone strength and reduce the risk of fracture in middle-aged and elderly European men.

Keywords

EpidemiologyUltrasoundBone mineral densityRisk factorsExercise

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010