Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 81, Issue 5, pp 352–363

Bone Mineral and Predictors of Bone Mass in White, Hispanic, and Asian Early Pubertal Girls

  • C. M. Weaver
  • L. D. McCabe
  • G. P. McCabe
  • R. Novotny
  • M. Van Loan
  • S. Going
  • V. Matkovic
  • C. Boushey
  • D. A. Savaiano
  • ACT Research Team
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00223-007-9074-5

Cite this article as:
Weaver, C.M., McCabe, L.D., McCabe, G.P. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (2007) 81: 352. doi:10.1007/s00223-007-9074-5

Abstract

Differences in bone among racial/ethnic groups may be explained by differences in body size and shape. Previous studies have not completely explained differences among white, Asian, and Hispanic groups during growth. To determine racial/ethnic differences and predictors of bone mass in early pubertal girls, we measured bone mineral content (BMC) in white, Hispanic, and Asian sixth-grade girls across six states in the United States. We developed models for predicting BMC for the total-body, distal radius, total-hip, and lumbar spine for 748 subjects. For each of the bone sites, the corresponding area from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was a strong predictor of BMC, with correlations ranging 0.78–0.98, confirming that larger subjects have more BMC. Anthropometric measures of bone area were nearly as effective as bone area from DXA at predicting BMC. For total-body, distal radius, lumbar spine, and total-hip BMC, racial/ethnic differences were explained by differences in bone area, sexual maturity, physical activity, and dairy calcium intake. Bone size explained most of the racial/ethnic differences in BMC, although behavioral indicators were also significant predictors of BMC.

Keywords

BonePubertyGirlsRaceEthnicityAnthropometry

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Weaver
    • 1
  • L. D. McCabe
    • 2
  • G. P. McCabe
    • 2
  • R. Novotny
    • 3
  • M. Van Loan
    • 4
  • S. Going
    • 5
  • V. Matkovic
    • 6
  • C. Boushey
    • 1
  • D. A. Savaiano
    • 1
  • ACT Research Team
  1. 1.Department of Foods and NutritionPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Department of StatisticsPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  3. 3.Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal SciencesUniversity of Hawaii-ManoaHonoluluUSA
  4. 4.US Department of Agriculture Western Human Nutrition Research CenterUniversity of California-DavisDavisUSA
  5. 5.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  6. 6.Bone and Mineral Metabolism LaboratoryOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA