Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 118, Issue 3, pp 435–438

Transcranial magnetic stimulation selectively impairs interhemispheric transfer of visuo-motor information in humans

  • C. A. Marzi
  • C. Miniussi
  • A. Maravita
  • L. Bertolasi
  • J. C. Rothwell
  • J. N. Sanes
  • G. Zanette
RESEARCH NOTE

DOI: 10.1007/s002210050299

Cite this article as:
Marzi, C., Miniussi, C., Maravita, A. et al. Exp Brain Res (1998) 118: 435. doi:10.1007/s002210050299

Abstract

 We investigated the cerebral cortical route by which visual information reaches motor cortex when visual signals are used for manual responses. Subjects responded unimanually to photic stimuli delivered to the hemifield ipsilateral or contralateral to the moving hand. On some trials, trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied unilaterally over the occiput, with the aim of stimulating extrastriate visual areas and thereby modifying transmission of visual input. In association with the side of a visual stimulus and a motor response, TMS could change inter- or intra-hemispheric transmission needed to convey visual information to motor areas. Reaction time differences following TMS suggested that TMS exerted an inhibitory effect only when visuo-motor information had to be transferred interhemispherically. This result reinforces evidence for an extrastriate pathway of interhemispheric transfer of visuomotor information.

Key words Transcranial magnetic stimulation Interhemispheric transfer Simple reaction time Manual response Poffenberger paradigm Human 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. Marzi
    • 1
  • C. Miniussi
    • 1
  • A. Maravita
    • 1
  • L. Bertolasi
    • 1
  • J. C. Rothwell
    • 2
  • J. N. Sanes
    • 3
  • G. Zanette
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche e della Visione, Universita′ di Verona, Strada Le Grazie, I-37134 Verona, Italy Fax: +39-45-580881, e-mail: marzic@borgoroma.univr.itIT
  2. 2.Human Movement and Balance Unit, Medical Research Council, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UKGB
  3. 3.Department of Neuroscience, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USAUS