Research Article

Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 227, Issue 2, pp 275-288

Silent articulation modulates auditory and audiovisual speech perception

  • Marc SatoAffiliated withGIPSA-LAB, UMR CNRS 5216, Département Parole and Cognition, Grenoble UniversitéCentre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, McGill University Email author 
  • , Emilie TroilleAffiliated withGIPSA-LAB, UMR CNRS 5216, Département Parole and Cognition, Grenoble UniversitéCentre de Recherche sur l’Imaginaire, Université Stendhal
  • , Lucie MénardAffiliated withCentre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, McGill UniversityDépartement de Linguistique, Université du Québec à Montréal
  • , Marie-Agnès CathiardAffiliated withCentre de Recherche sur l’Imaginaire, Université Stendhal
  • , Vincent GraccoAffiliated withCentre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, McGill UniversitySchool of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill UniversityHaskins Laboratories

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Abstract

The concept of an internal forward model that internally simulates the sensory consequences of an action is a central idea in speech motor control. Consistent with this hypothesis, silent articulation has been shown to modulate activity of the auditory cortex and to improve the auditory identification of concordant speech sounds, when embedded in white noise. In the present study, we replicated and extended this behavioral finding by showing that silently articulating a syllable in synchrony with the presentation of a concordant auditory and/or visually ambiguous speech stimulus improves its identification. Our results further demonstrate that, even in the case of perfect perceptual identification, concurrent mouthing of a syllable speeds up the perceptual processing of a concordant speech stimulus. These results reflect multisensory-motor interactions during speech perception and provide new behavioral arguments for internally generated sensory predictions during silent speech production.

Keywords

Speech perception Speech production Silent speech Audiovisual speech perception Internal forward models Sensory-motor interactions Efference copy McGurk effect