Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 202, Issue 4, pp 809–824

Robot-assisted modifications of gait in healthy individuals

  • Seok Hun Kim
  • Sai K. Banala
  • Elizabeth A. Brackbill
  • Sunil K. Agrawal
  • Vijaya Krishnamoorthy
  • John P. Scholz
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-010-2187-5

Cite this article as:
Kim, S.H., Banala, S.K., Brackbill, E.A. et al. Exp Brain Res (2010) 202: 809. doi:10.1007/s00221-010-2187-5
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Abstract

This study investigated whether short-term modifications of gait could be induced in healthy adults and whether a combination of kinetic (a compliant force resisting deviation of the foot from the prescribed footpath) and visual guidance was superior to either kinetic guidance or visual guidance alone in producing this modification. Thirty-nine healthy adults, 20–33 years old, were randomly assigned to the three groups receiving six 10-min blocks of treadmill training requiring them to modify their footpath to match a scaled-down path. Changes of the footpath, specific joint events and joint moments were analyzed. Persons receiving combined kinetic and visual guidance showed larger modifications of their gait patterns that were maintained longer, persisting up to 2 h after intervening over-ground activities, than did persons receiving training with primarily kinetic guidance or with visual guidance alone. The results emphasize the short-term plasticity of locomotor circuits and provide a possible basis for persons learning to achieve more functional gait patterns following a stroke or other neurological disorders.

Keywords

Gait Adaptation Rehabilitation Stroke 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seok Hun Kim
    • 1
  • Sai K. Banala
    • 2
  • Elizabeth A. Brackbill
    • 2
  • Sunil K. Agrawal
    • 2
  • Vijaya Krishnamoorthy
    • 3
  • John P. Scholz
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation SciencesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA
  3. 3.Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation MedicineEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Physical TherapyUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA
  5. 5.Biomechanics and Movement Science Program, University of DelawareNewarkUSA

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