Experimental Brain Research

, Volume 195, Issue 1, pp 167–172

Perception of movement extent depends on the extent of previous movements

  • Tatjana Seizova-Cajic
  • Janette L. Smith
  • Janet L. Taylor
  • Simon C. Gandevia
Research Note

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-009-1780-y

Cite this article as:
Seizova-Cajic, T., Smith, J.L., Taylor, J.L. et al. Exp Brain Res (2009) 195: 167. doi:10.1007/s00221-009-1780-y

Abstract

We report an aftereffect in perception of the extent (or degree or range) of joint movement, showing for the first time that a prolonged exposure to a passive back-and-forth movement of a certain extent results in a change in judgment of the extent of a subsequently presented movement. The adapting stimulus, movement about the wrist, had an extent of either 30° or 75°, while the test stimulus was a 50° movement. Following a 4-min adaptation period, the estimated magnitudes of the test stimuli were 61° and 36° in the 30° and 75° condition, respectively (t test(6) = 9.6; p < 0.001). The observed effect is an instance of repulsion or contrast commonly described in perception literature, with perceived value of the test stimulus pushed away from the adapting stimulus.

Keywords

ProprioceptionKinesthesisAdaptationAftereffectsMovement extent

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatjana Seizova-Cajic
    • 2
  • Janette L. Smith
    • 3
  • Janet L. Taylor
    • 1
  • Simon C. Gandevia
    • 1
  1. 1.Prince of Wales Medical Research InstituteUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of SydneyLidcombeAustralia
  3. 3.School of PsychologyUniversity of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia